Monthly Archives: July 2013

Making the best of an odd situation

I am the master of taking something totally unexpected and making it work. I guess that comes from growing up in a reasonably dysfunctional household where some things were not in the general script, and I learned how to “wing” it.

Friday night, I met someone at the Portland Museum of Art, so we could share what was on display. Once we were through with the Paley collection, he announced that he can only do two hours of art, and had other things he needed to take care of. I am a sponge for good art, and realized as we took in the Picassos and Matisses, how somewhat starved I was for this kind of visual stimulation. I flatly stated that I was going to stay and see what was on the 2nd and 3rd floor. My departing date gave me permission, like I needed it. (I don’t think I’ll see this person again.)

So, I went upstairs to see the permanent collection of work which is primarily from the Impressionism through contemporary. Refreshing! I’d like to note here that though this museum may pale in stature to the MFA in Boston, it is comparable in quality.

On to the third floor, where, when I saw the huge Ellsworth Kelly, I decided a little documentation was in order. I found a docent who I asked about the photo policy. This museum has a policy that allows non-flash photography of work that belongs to the museum, and the name card have an icon which shows which ones are not. Unfortunately the Kelly is not theirs, and the Louise Nevelson photo was out of focus.

The young docent had also told me that the Paley Collection could be photographed even though it was on loan from MoMA. So, after taking a couple more quick ones upstairs, I went back down to the main floor.

The Guitar, Pablo Picasso @ The Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine

The Guitar, Pablo Picasso @ The Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine

Burghers of Calais (miniature), August Rodin @ The Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine.

Burghers of Calais (miniature), August Rodin @ The Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine.

These are both from the “Taste for Modernism” exhibit.

And, on the third floor is this remarkable piece called “Books in the Running Brook”, Alison HIldreth. This is part of their permanent collection. My only problem with this piece is where it is hung. It is impossible to take in the full impact looking directly straight at it.

Books in the Running Brooks

After I departed the museum, I still wasn’t done. And, I shot a few photos, thus creating a little art of my own…

Lampost in Portland, (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

Lampost in Portland, (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

I made it a good night!!

Advertisements

Eventually, it all makes sense…

Eventually, it all makes sense….

Eventually, it all makes sense…

It’s been an interesting exploration of materials and sensibilities, but I think I am starting to hit the destination of this part of my artistic ramblings.

I’ll make some comments per piece:

Link (originally called Mettle), 2013. @Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst. MM on canvas, 12" x 12"

“Link” (originally called “Mettle”), 2013. (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst. MM on canvas, 12″ x 12″

This is not 100% finished, but it made some very impressive leaps right out of my control today. I am finding that palette knife application is helping with some of the grit and spontaneity I want to show. Though I love working with the plaster, this is also more stable, and I will get enough of the desired surface. I expect to add more paint, copper foil and wire to this. This is one of the 14 pieces that will be part of the Seacoast Moderns collaboration piece that will be displayed during the “Mettle” show at the Kittery Art Association,September 19-October 13.

"Replanting", 2013. (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst,  MM on canvas panel, 9" x 12"

“Replanting”, 2013. (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, MM on canvas panel, 9″ x 12″

I love that I don’t automatically discard “failures”. The photography on here originally buckled, but this has been sitting under other art for a few months, and nicely flattened out. I added a lot of paint today-and there will be more to come. This is part of the “Razing the Garden” series.

The next two pieces are part of the “Rural Contracts” series, but are referencing a very different part of rural peoples’ realities. Much more to be done on these!

"Reservations 1", 2013 (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, MM on particle board, 18" x 14".

“Reservations 1″, 2013 (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, MM on particle board, 18″ x 14”.

“Reservations 2”, 2013 (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

 

Recycling

In the prep for having my sister here for the week-end, I have up-ended the apartment to find places to store art that I did not want on the floor, and rearranged the walls to accommodate more of the recent work that hasn’t sold.

I have found canvases, in the process, that have images that do not work. Bonus!!! I tend to get like a mother when I paint something, only to realize that if I saved all of these children….landfills would overflow.

Let the repainting begin. An 18″ x 24″ canvas has a coat of Zinc Oxide. There are canvas panels waiting for me to wipe off their original images.

A bad 18" x 24" getting a rehab so it can be something else

A bad 18″ x 24″ getting a rehab so it can be something else

Canvas panels that I inherited that will be repainted that fit behind.

Canvas panels that I inherited that will be repainted that will fit behind the iron roses.

 

Nikki Sullivan at the Gatehouse Gallery

The Gatehouse Gallery has a solid line-up for the season, which started with David Sordi’s stellar photographs last month.

Nikki Sullivan, a mosaic artist that hales from eastern Connecticut, is this month’s featured artist.

The work that had been handled in the past I regarded as more craft and decorative, since it was mainly part of jewelry, ceramics and mirrors. The inlay-work itself was more part of a utilitarian piece.

Some of this is here this month along with some ingenious mosaics and mixed-media pieces that are all about, well, art. Themselves. Expression. Texture, color and form.

Nikki Sullivan at the Gatehouse Gallery, Tamworth, NH

Nikki Sullivan at the Gatehouse Gallery, Tamworth, NH

Nikki Sullivan, Gatehouse Gallery 2

Nikki Sullivan, Gatehouse Gallery 2

This show is absolutely well-worth the effort to go slightly out of your way as you head toward North Conway to shop, camp, hike or raft.

http://gatehousegallery.com/art/ for more information

 

Notes for July 14, 2013

"October Surprise", 2013. mixed media including plaster, photo, twigs, oils, 11" x 14".

“October Surprise”, 2013. mixed media including plaster, photo, twigs, oils, 11″ x 14″.

As the work continues to evolve, I am having successes and failures. This is probably the most stable, and for that reason, the most successful, plaster piece to date. I think, after this one, I will reserve plaster work for cooler, drier days. In the meantime, though this piece is off-topic, because it really doesn’t have any social message, the snow/plaster combination seems to be working.

"Mettle", 2013, oil photo, copper foil and wire on canvas, 12" x 12".

“Mettle”, 2013, oil, photo, copper foil and wire on canvas, 12″ x 12″.

The copper and wire are not here yet, and this is in it’s infancy. This piece will be part of the Moderns show at the KAA in September. Even with Liquin, this little bit of impasto is still wet.

My economic situation seems to be changing, and I am feeling comfortable with the idea of buying the necessary equipment to start working in paint again. Feels great!!

 

Humidity is evil!

I grew up in southern California, where lots of things are evil, but humidity is rarely one of them. In my most recent art, I am trying many things, and revisiting mediums with maybe a different angle than eons ago. I have found success in some—and real problems, with others!

I did a fair number of pieces, and larger ones (48″ x 32″) where the plaster remained stable, as long as I poured some white glue in with it. I kept the layers fairly thin on application, as well.

I am experiencing cracking as the pieces cure (now), though even 5 years ago, in Barrington, because the humidity was lower, I did not have a problem. Even after curing, I am still dealing with it! I also think that working with the powder vs. the pre-mixed might also have been a factor, though I am not sure why.

So, any FYI for those of you playing in this medium-I love it but it’s heavy, and now…unstable. I will update if I find a solution.

Serendipity

The Find that I have no clue what I will do with!!

The Find that I have no clue what I will do with!!

I am non-religious, but spiritual, and I do believe that when you ask, certain needs are answered. I am reading the “Hunger Games”. and these are the kinds of  answers I get. And, when I least expect them.

I have no idea what I will do with this but I watched the bench decay. Today, as I was taking out my trash, I realized that it had been hit by a fallen limb from the tree it sat under. Other yard waste was also present. The bench was flattened.

I uncovered it, dragged it to the deck, cleaned and sanded it down. As a mixed-media, found object painter,  it is a gem.

Last week, for the same reason (looking for materials),  I picked up wood from some body else’s trash. I now have a tabletop.

Serendipity.

Piece in progress

 

"For Those Who Built It", (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, 22" x 5 1/2, MM, not finished

“For Those Who Built It”, (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, 22″ x 5 1/2, MM, not finished

I am not anywhere close to finished here-but it is coming along.

Also, stay tuned for Kittery Art Association Seacoast Moderns updates. The group has gelled.