Making the best of an odd situation

I am the master of taking something totally unexpected and making it work. I guess that comes from growing up in a reasonably dysfunctional household where some things were not in the general script, and I learned how to “wing” it.

Friday night, I met someone at the Portland Museum of Art, so we could share what was on display. Once we were through with the Paley collection, he announced that he can only do two hours of art, and had other things he needed to take care of. I am a sponge for good art, and realized as we took in the Picassos and Matisses, how somewhat starved I was for this kind of visual stimulation. I flatly stated that I was going to stay and see what was on the 2nd and 3rd floor. My departing date gave me permission, like I needed it. (I don’t think I’ll see this person again.)

So, I went upstairs to see the permanent collection of work which is primarily from the Impressionism through contemporary. Refreshing! I’d like to note here that though this museum may pale in stature to the MFA in Boston, it is comparable in quality.

On to the third floor, where, when I saw the huge Ellsworth Kelly, I decided a little documentation was in order. I found a docent who I asked about the photo policy. This museum has a policy that allows non-flash photography of work that belongs to the museum, and the name card have an icon which shows which ones are not. Unfortunately the Kelly is not theirs, and the Louise Nevelson photo was out of focus.

The young docent had also told me that the Paley Collection could be photographed even though it was on loan from MoMA. So, after taking a couple more quick ones upstairs, I went back down to the main floor.

The Guitar, Pablo Picasso @ The Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine

The Guitar, Pablo Picasso @ The Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine

Burghers of Calais (miniature), August Rodin @ The Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine.

Burghers of Calais (miniature), August Rodin @ The Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine.

These are both from the “Taste for Modernism” exhibit.

And, on the third floor is this remarkable piece called “Books in the Running Brook”, Alison HIldreth. This is part of their permanent collection. My only problem with this piece is where it is hung. It is impossible to take in the full impact looking directly straight at it.

Books in the Running Brooks

After I departed the museum, I still wasn’t done. And, I shot a few photos, thus creating a little art of my own…

Lampost in Portland, (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

Lampost in Portland, (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

I made it a good night!!

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About artinsmallplaces

I am Daryl-Ann Hurst, (also using Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst), an artist and writer, who is also interested in antiques, travel and the outdoors. I am hoping to use this blog to meld all of the interests. I was born and raised in California, have a BA in art, have been published in the New England Antiques Journal and have photography on the Gulf of Maine's website. I have shown paintings and prints nationally since 1978.

Posted on 07/28/2013, in art, collage, Maine, mixed media, museum, New York, photography and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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