Monthly Archives: March 2015

“Some of my Sisters”, ISIS and art

Art and politics works…sometimes. Most of the time, the art should be on the poster of the cause, and left there. But, not always.

I am of the mindset that political and social consciousness should be an underlying part, but hitting someone over the head with it…not my game.

I read an article yesterday in the Rolling Stone: http://www.rollingstone.com/culture/features/teenage-jihad-inside-the-world-of-american-kids-seduced-by-isis-20150325 This is incredibly chilling and scary.

It has obviously been brewing in my brain, because this was created today:

"Some of my Sisters", (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, mixed media on paper

“Some of my Sisters”, (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, mixed media on paper

I don’t need to swear, wave a tampon in your face, ask you to eat me, or whatever.

I need to make you think, and hard, about what ISIS is doing to “Some of my Sisters”. And, yours.

 

More about recapitulating art history

So, as a young buck, I sucked up the intellectualism that surrounded me. I embraced “Concept” (with a capital “C”) very tightly. But, hey, I was in LA.

Almost 30 years since I left my home town, I have faced an exhibit that seems so totally out of context, and yet, right on my fingertips and so ready to be here. Carly Glovinski is the cause, and 3S is the platform.

“Huh? Ok? And, why”. I am not really intrigued any more by this work than the work I came “of age” with- NOW. I totally get it. But, again I grew up in LA.

But, my fundamental question in all of this is the question of process. There is little “human” presence in this work-foibles and mistakes aren’t noticeable. Let’s revisit concept and Larry Bell. Laddie Dill and all those folks that had artworks built for them. So, I am dealing with process…why? Because I have gotten older and I have been here for 30 years.

I believe Glovinski actually fabricates her own work. Cleanly, and well.

She defines space, and forces her audience to recognize that space. She made me explain to friends why a large floor piece does not allow a piece on the wall. The show made me explain the value of scale.

Eva Hesse did much with a floor. And,I see that here, as well. But, I think the best thing about this show is she doesn’t stick exclusively to one perameter-determiner, but actually strikes out to say, “Yeah, but?”

But, the fun thing with this show is we see more modes of expression. “Evolving Coast” a wood book on a lawn chair says I’m not about space and minimalism. Once again challenging the viewer to scratch their heads.

And, as artists, we do get to make people do that.

Part III. Beyond Process

The best work I have ever seen was created by Ed Kienholz for making people rethink their space. And, change behavior.

https://www.google.com/search?q=ed+kienholz+the+beanery&rlz=1C1GGGE_enUS452US463&espv=2&biw=1366&bih=667&tbm=isch&imgil=J_TJVJjs2QquRM%253A%253BybLdXCWMAuwyjM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.flickriver.com%25252Fphotos%25252Fde_buurman%25252Fsets%25252F72157631732847631%25252F&source=iu&pf=m&fir=J_TJVJjs2QquRM%253A%252CybLdXCWMAuwyjM%252C_&usg=__ddbs_zOnnmacmMq-s9vsoFkD7K4%3D&ved=0CCcQyjc&ei=5CIXVfjJNMe5ggSItYSAAg#imgdii=J_TJVJjs2QquRM%3A%3BpOGS7Bt9MrAewM%3BJ_TJVJjs2QquRM%3A&imgrc=J_TJVJjs2QquRM%253A%3BybLdXCWMAuwyjM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Ffarm9.static.flickr.com%252F8459%252F8071860653_575b04898d.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.flickriver.com%252Fphotos%252Fde_buurman%252Fsets%252F72157631732847631%252F%3B500%3B332

or this

http://www.artchive.com/artchive/K/kienholz/john_doe.jpg.html

It really doesn’t take some of the methods being used in some of the most controversial art from last year. It really doesn’t take vulgarity, profanity, or even sex.

One of my recent personal favorite artists whom I am very honored and privileged to show with is Rick Burns. He has shown work at Blackbird Studio and Gallery that also asks people to participate. He doesn’t take over a floor space, but he asks for thought, and gets it.

He doesn’t necessarily question space, but he does create work that invites the viewer to also be a participant in his work, and change it.

(c)Rick Burns

(c)Rick Burns

This piece invited the viewer/participant to tighten/loosen the bolts. And, many did, begging again the question of “Who is the artist?

I’ll continue to call myself one, but I think we need to give more credit to our audience.

And, I am sure I will continue with this subject.

 

 

Press release for Timeless and the Rochester Library

The next couple of months will be very big for the visual arts in the area. Events are starting to overlap, and I can only be in so many places at once!!

This is my contribution to artwork offerings.

Timeless and Rochester Library press release

I hope all can attend!

My recapitulation of art history, in parts-reaction to a new show

PART 1

Art didn’t begin with Picasso, or Duchamp.

If you listened to some and looked at others though, you might think so. I saw a show this week that made me think that maybe the 1970s needed to be revisited-but I can’t agree. So, I thought about some of my history.

I grew up in Los Angeles. Larry Bell’sand Laddie John Dill’s  work is very familiar to me. I knew it, saw it first hand. So is the work of Ed Keinholz. The 1960s was an incredibly rich period in experiment and redefinition.

Painting was dead for a period, too. I think I was a sophomore, painting like I never had before. And, then that period ended, almost as quickly as it started. I never quit, but I found really “left brain” ways of painting, which also satisfied the norm to justify why I liked my brushes.

Once painting was “OK” again, there was a new period called “minimalism”. I loved the likes of Brice Marden. Peter Lodata was an absolute sweetheart in his cowboy boots. Yeah, I met these guys. But, the art he made was so intensely intellectual and it answered one question. One question. And, once you got it, it was time to move on.

James Haywood’s minimalism changed with light, but a piece needed to be placed in just the right place…

 

Peter Lodato at a show in 2011

Peter Lodato at a show in 2011

But, the mid 70’s signaled another social change . And, as I had figured out minimalism, from there I got pattern-painting, a new style-shift.

Four by Four, 1982 (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hust, acrylic on 16 canvases

Four by Four, 1982 (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, acrylic on 16 canvases,8×8 feet.

Pattern painting justified by great poetic waxing of figure-ground ambiguity continued for a number of years, and some of my artistic statements are so textbook, though I never used one.

To be continued…

 

 

 

 

The website

For those who follow my blog, you are aware of last week’s dilemma. Phone calls were made; I do have a discounted rate, and a written document to fall back on now.

This is the first time I have ever been able to put up this much work in this nice a format without it being technically dreadful.

Please check it out and share it with your people: http://www.dadartthurst.com  Please visit frequently because this is my online retrospective,and I am adding almost daily. It was meant originally to go back only as far as 1985, but I have unearthed some rather interesting vintage stuff. Well, not quite vintage, but close!

Censorship, and why “fuck” is only OK in some places

First of all, I am speaking as Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, artist and photographer. I have affiliations, boards that I serve on, etc. I am speaking for none of them-I am speaking for me here. So, please let none of these opinions fall back on any of those relationships.

The idea of censorship as a topic actually crossed my desk last week in an article that ran in the Washington Post online that dealt with Facebook. Let’s start here.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-intersect/wp/2015/03/09/facebook-censored-a-nude-painting-and-it-could-change-the-site-forever/

This is art, fine art, art that has been revered for more than a century. Art that is academically accepted. Museum art. Art that changed ways that we think about…art. And, what can be exhibited. What is acceptable. As nauseum.

Facebook censored this image, claiming that it was not acceptable for “grandma”. OK. Is grandma reading every site posting art? Out of the zillion sites, is every one being visited by “grandma”? I have to tell you, I did a bit of a “stalk” on a few of a friend’s site (don’t we all-but I was looking at art), and there was outright huge pornography on one. Huge-no questions-a penis in the vagina type.

So, I am confused as to who determines what is acceptable on Facebook.

The local issue is less of who, but more about why.

Beth Wittenberg recently was asked by the Rochester Museum of Fine Art to be the first to display in a venue in downtown Rochester, New Hampshire. The storefront on Main Street, that used to be Carney Medical’s has been given over to the museum for temporary displays, known as “pop ups”.

Now, I’ll give you a little background on the museum. It is a total voluntary operation. We have little financial support-and yes, I did switch “person”, because I am on the Curatorial Board. We are basically a self-governed concern except when it comes to our displays. We use any decent space given to us, and the Carney space availed itself to something new. The libraries, Community Center and Town Hall have set parameters regarding nudity, violence, profanity, etc.

Because the Carney space is new for us, the decision was to relax the restrictions. This turned out to not be what that concern was comfortable with, so we were asked to pull the offending work.

The result has been a railing by the presenting artist, as well as other artists in the area, against the museum.

The Carney Mediacla storefront

The Carney Mediacla storefront

So, here we are. A museum with no owned real estate, trying to present what we can, and pushing as many envelops as we can too. In this case, we went a bit too far. So, here’s the why.  Because we don’t own it, we have to bow to the owners.

The blame of censorship needs to go elsewhere, in this case, as well as the cry that the museum should not have pulled this show.

I, as an artist, hate this. I want to say what the fuck I want and when the fuck I want to say it. And HOWEVER the fuck I need to do that. But, the museum has to do this-because, again, this is borrowed real estate.

And, as the Show Coordinator of the Berwick Art Association, every time I hang one of our shows in a local library or school, you best believe, there will be no “fuck” in any of the pieces I hang. Again, not my choice if it were my walls, but they are family walls. As a rep of the BAA…”fuck” ain’t OK here, either.

 

 

Size matters

I saw the work at the Carnegie Gallery by the South African artist Marsi van de Huevel yesterday. The Carnegie Gallery is an amazing little art oasis in Rochester, New Hampshire in the Rochester Public Library, which is curated by the Rochester Museum of Fine Art. I am a member of the board and proud to be representing this incredible work.

 

"The Moon", (c)Marsi van de Huevel, giclee, but the original is graphite.

“The Moon”, (c)Marsi van de Huevel, giclee, but the original is graphite.

First, there is the medium. This work is painstakingly produced with pen and ink. Incredibly time-consuming.

Secondly, larger than “sketchbook scale” here is also presented.  Scale in some mediums isn’t questioned. It used to be, “the bigger the more important”, because, well, it’s harder to ignore. So bigger oils and acrylics are now often dismissed just BECAUSE of size, meaning that rule really doesn’t apply to painting unless they really deserve the size. That rule has been around for decades.

Dry mediums and watercolor are usually not presented in a larger format, nor are pen and inks, which is why van de Huevel’s and work I need to revisit at The Gallery at 100 Market Street are important. It is time we challenge what can be large, and ignore the framing!

To be continued…

The hidden costs of being a professional artist

The questions have made the rounds for many years in my head as to how much do I have to spend to do this? Being an artist is one thing, and the costs for that are strictly what I need to purchase supplies. Framing is optional. I can hang the finished work with tacks or nails or tape.

And, then I entered the world of showing the work. Now, I had to make sure the work was “ready-to-hang”, and learned to read the fine print as to what that means. Framing was no longer optional, and I had to learn to putty corners and repaint frames. I also learned early-on that as much as I love museum glass, I was going to use commercial glass, and hope that my patrons loved the work enough to protect it from UV light.

Since I entered the professional world, I have also become a certified framer, and own a decent mat cutter, and know my way around putting together paper pieces without horribly upsetting the budget. But, that is mainly because I can take care of the labor, and I don’t go for the best frames, just something reasonable. Everything that comes in direct contact with the work, like mat board and foam core, though, is acid-free.

Most of my work is oil-based, and on canvas. Skinny stretcher bars warp, so I make it a point to get the thick stretcher bars for big work, ie. larger than 16″ x 20″.

All of the above is fine and predictable. What I was never taught in school is what the marketing would cost. When I set out in 1987 to really start to make “my name”, I found myself spending more on slides and postage. Then, there was a trip to New York so I could do what was known then as the “humility shuffle”-complete with a two-night stay in a Manhattan hotel, food, etc. It was considered a mini-vaca, but I still worked one solid afternoon with my late husband canvasing the galleries before I actually approached them. I did get a slot in a group show. Then, I shelled out shipping and  insurance to not sell anything.

The Internet has eliminated the need for the slides, but not for an occasional disc, and the related postage. But, it has not completely negated any expenses that may not have been anticipated.

Enter the required website. The web universe is free unless you don’t code. And, even then, space needs to be purchased. And, then there is that pesky domain name.

I have done well so far with this blog, and I even picked up a gallery and two sales through it. I am on it enough that I get a fair Google share through my name. But, Tuesday night, even though I have a few half-assed attempts at building a site out in Internet land, I had a curator who really wanted more than I had posted on a site, and not to have to wade through all of the 2014 posts here.

On Wednesday, I found a web builder that appeared to be low-cost, with a free domain name included, for the first year.  Ah, I signed up, without a way to find the true cost after the introductory one-month $1.95. Yikes!! It was $21.95 per month!! I called them to cancel, and talked to a very nice rep who presumably set me up with a site for $9.95 plus their security fee which is an additional $1.95. So, I worked for the last three days to build a great looking site, and the platform is a delight to work. But, this afternoon, I checked my billing info and I am set up to be billed for $21.95 next month. REALLY??

I set out after that to resurrect the weebly site, and though it isn’t great, it’s free. If I want to add my domain name I can, but that puts into a more premium status and hence, I pay for the domain and the right to eliminate their name from my present one with them.

So, Monday, I will find out if I am out $3.90 and some time-I just hope I have two now working web sites!

Fungi and Flora, at the Gafney Library

Some of the area’s art offerings require a 20-40 minute drive. The Gafney Library has gained the reputation for the offering some of the best of who Strafford County has for art. And, since I showed there last month…

MaryAnne O'Mara and Peggy Brewster at the Gafney

MaryAnne O’Mara and Peggy Brewster at the Gafney

Gabe shoots "Flora and Fungi"

Gabe shoots “Flora and Fungi”

 

 

Openings… and openings… and…openings

I never thought I’d have 4 opening receptions in one week. All group shows. And, one in Norway. But, I’m impressed still.

Tuesday night, the show that I coordinate for the Berwick Art Association opened at the Berwick Public Library, Berwick, Maine. The  show is 46 pieces strong, and includes 20 artists from around the region including: Beth Wittenberg, Christine Kfoury, Anne Vaughan, Bob Farrell, Jean Coughlin, Erika Carty, Rita Fuller, Christy Bruna, Michael Bramlett, Laura Tuininga, Gloria Houlne, Eric Pomorski, Roseann Meserve, Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, Jane Lissner, Lee Copp, Gene Galipeau, Tom Gillis, Ruth Bleau, Bruce Bacon.

Turn-out was light, but we had a good time! And, it is a great show. It will be up through March 27.

A number of the artists at the opening at the Berwick Library BAA show

A number of the artists at the opening at the Berwick Library BAA show

Thursday, I was part of an opening in Moss, Norway. I am not going to import Facebook or Twitter images here. It was a benefit, and I was happy to  donate a piece-and it’s cool to say I have been shown in Norway!

Friday, was crazy. I am done with openings…until next Friday.

The Gallery at 100 Market Street is an important place for me to show for a spectrum of reasons. And, this was my 5th appearance on these walls. I have two small pieces on the 4th floor that I didn’t shoot for the blog. This was not my most impressive appearance, but there are more to come.

The show was filled with gems, as usual. I will have to go back to shoot more, because what I shot last night was awful.

The BUOY in Kittery, Maine hosts an aRtPM Challenge annually where the only restriction for inclusion to this show is it has to have been created within the month of February. I included “Muzykzny” last year, even though the sides were still slightly wet. This year, a piece called “Valentine” graces their walls. She’s the faceless watercolor to the bottom left.

"Valentine" at BUOY

“Valentine” at BUOY

“Valentine” at BUOY

I saw a ton of other people’s art today.

Don’t underestimate this area!