Category Archives: galleries

“In the Name of Progress”, and my solo this month

In the Name of Progress

This is finished just in time for my show this month at the Franklin Gallery, in RiverStones Framing at 33 No. Main Street in Rochester, NH called “Transitions and Transmissions”.

To me, this image speaks volumes about how progress has left so much of our past literally in the dust. So much about the context of this is wrong. Where’s the farm? It’s parked on the side of US 202 in Maine. The flat tire and the chains in the middle of summer also adds to the story.

The collection that will be included is half abstracts and half pieces similar to this one.

I hope you can stop by for the opening reception on August 11, from 5-7.

“Fancy Parade and Other Recent Work”, opening reception, update

This will give you a sense of scale of the newest work. “Untarnished Symphony” is 98″ x 69″. I’m short at 5’1″, but still, they are quite large.

The opening reception was small, but pleasant-attended mostly by friends, and a few of the faculty and students.

I would now like to use this show as a place to talk to galleries in the area. It is up through April 28th at Great Bay Community College in Portsmouth, NH. Please feel free to contact me at artinsmallplaces@gmail.com.

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Seacoast Spotlight nomination and other upcoming events

The season has opened with a bang in the area, and I have gotten quite a bit of attention. That does not bother me or hurt my feelings, but it does change priorities!

Last Monday, I was able to secure the June slot at the Gallery 280, which is part of Portsmouth Public TV in Portsmouth, NH. I had submitted twice before, and heard nothing back. They changed directors, and I met with the new one last Monday. This will be a two-person show and includes a half-hour interview segment, which will air every Thursday during the month of June. Cool and intimidating!! (I will have about enough room for 20 of the ReDeFine series). That show will open June 4th.

I also have 4 pieces in an upcoming show at artstream gallery in Dover, NH called “Love Letters”.  These are all postcard-sized pieces. That show opens late in May.

The Gallery at 100 Market Street submission is due very soon, but the curator has expressed interest in the “Portrait” series. That show will open early June.

Blackbird Studio and Gallery reopened with resounding success with the Carolyn Chute visit and book-signing. We had our first official reception last week-end and had a good turn-out and sales!! Our next opening reception will be May 30, and I plan on having NO work on the walls. I am starting to install a very large installation piece on the property over Memorial Day, and I am developing it daily!

from the Carolyn Chute receptin

from the Carolyn Chute reception

The newest show at Blackbird Studio

The newest show at Blackbird Studio

Oh yeah, and the high point, and the reason for this post…I have been nominated in the “Outstanding Painter, Non Traditional” category for the Seacoast Spotlight Awards Editors’ Choice and I am also on the Readers’ Choice ballot. This nomination alone is a huge validation for hard work! And, the group I am “against” are really good painters and I am friends with one of them for the Editors’ Choice. I am friends with several for the Readers’ Choice.

http://www.seacoastonline.com/article/20150507/ENTERTAINMENTLIFE/150509688/101164/ENTERTAINMENT This is the explanation, and listing for the Editors’ Choice.

For the Readers’ Choice ballot, please visit this link: http://www.seacoastonline.com/article/20150507/ENTERTAINMENTLIFE/150509688/101164/ENTERTAINMENT. In the third paragraph, it says click “here” and that takes you to the survey/ballot. And, this will be very hotly contested, so I’d love as much help as possible!! Thanks!!

My show at the Rochester Library looks awesome too. That runs through the end of May.

Thanks for being here!!

 

 

 

Blackbird Studio and Gallery and Carolyn Chute

What a way to reopen!

Blackbird Studio and Gallery is very honored to host our reopening for 2015 with a special guest author, Carolyn Chute, who will give a talk and book-signing next Saturday,  April 18, from 1-3 pm.

http://www.fosters.com/article/20150402/NEWS/150409992/14323

I stopped by today, to see the new ceiling. We will be ready.

our new ceiling

our new ceiling

The gallery officially reopens on Wednesday.

Blackbird (c) daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

Blackbird (c) daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

We are planning a variety of events throughout the season, so please visit blackbirdmaine.org

Mills and Mills

The region is dotted with many old and no longer operational water-powered paper and pulp mills. Brick factory buildings are also easily found. This part of New England has a strong history in a huge variety of manufacturing and other types of production-related businesses from the original Frank Jones Brewery complex in downtown Portsmouth, to the Button Factory on the other side of Islington. The Schultz meat plant is geographically right between the two. And, is decaying, where the other two now house an athletic club and artist studios, respectively.

The Schultz factory, Mat House Annex side (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

The Schultz factory, Malt House Annex side (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

I asked a friend of mine who is very involved in Portsmouth New Hampshire politics (where I am sure this is a terrific embarrassment), and the owner seems to have no motivation to clean it up and make it serviceable to businesses, artists, etc. What a shame!!

And, I actually find that whole idea extremely short-sighted considering what the Button Factory charges for studio space, and the last time I checked they were full!! http://www.buttonfactorystudios.com/studio_availability.htm

I have friends who have studios in the 1 Washington Street Mill Building in Dover, New Hampshire. This is a multi-use building that serves a myriad of businesses like Terra Cotta Pasta, a few smaller galleries, framing studios, apparel retailers, and other concerns. Dover has at least three complexes that are all successful in renting to those who need space but maybe don’t need the street-level, strip mall type exposure.

The Rollinsford Mill is very much like the 1 Washington Street Mill except it is heavily rented as art studio space. They, like the Button Factory, host open-studio events where the public is invited to come and experience the art at the Mill and purchase it outside the pretty gallery setting, directly from the artists.

In my travels taking pictures and just reveling in the spring sunshine, I drove (for no reason) to Sanford, Maine. In Sanford, there is a mill complex that looks a lot like the Schultz Factory.

the empty Sanford Mills building (c) DA Dartt Hurst

the empty Sanford Mills building (c) DA Dartt Hurst

No apparent recon is going on with this site, yet it is on a terrific piece of property with a great view. I took a few minutes to walk along this side of the building, and the front and shot this for art.

Sanford Mill venting, (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

Sanford Mill venting, (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

But, I wasn’t through wandering-the weather was not allowing this cabin-fevered child to be inside all day!

I went home, and lost the New Balance and socks to Tevas. Yes, and toes are happy! But, I was not done finding new treasures.

Gonic is a non-incorporated town that is really part of Rochester, but, like East Rochester, there is a different personality. I got here quite by accident, and found another mill building. But one I didn’t know about. And, one that has been restored, but hasn’t become trendy yet. Uh-oh!

This one has huge spaces, and though I haven’t seen them yet, they could be possibly rented as a group and sub-divided. Rents are crazy-cheap! Like they should be for a studio!

Gonic Mill, with the Cocheco River (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

Gonic Mill, with the Cocheco River (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

 

 

 

 

Size matters

I saw the work at the Carnegie Gallery by the South African artist Marsi van de Huevel yesterday. The Carnegie Gallery is an amazing little art oasis in Rochester, New Hampshire in the Rochester Public Library, which is curated by the Rochester Museum of Fine Art. I am a member of the board and proud to be representing this incredible work.

 

"The Moon", (c)Marsi van de Huevel, giclee, but the original is graphite.

“The Moon”, (c)Marsi van de Huevel, giclee, but the original is graphite.

First, there is the medium. This work is painstakingly produced with pen and ink. Incredibly time-consuming.

Secondly, larger than “sketchbook scale” here is also presented.  Scale in some mediums isn’t questioned. It used to be, “the bigger the more important”, because, well, it’s harder to ignore. So bigger oils and acrylics are now often dismissed just BECAUSE of size, meaning that rule really doesn’t apply to painting unless they really deserve the size. That rule has been around for decades.

Dry mediums and watercolor are usually not presented in a larger format, nor are pen and inks, which is why van de Huevel’s and work I need to revisit at The Gallery at 100 Market Street are important. It is time we challenge what can be large, and ignore the framing!

To be continued…

Valentine

"Valentine", 2015 (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, mixed media on handmade paper.

“Valentine”, 2015 (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, mixed media on handmade paper.

The Portrait series, or as they have come to be called, “The Personal Storms”, have evolved onto handmade paper. There are also bits of collage in this piece.

It will be on display at BUOY, Kittery, Maine through April. The opening reception for the show is this Friday, March 13, from 6-?

I meant to see some art today

I was feeling like I was either sliding on ice, or my paint really needed a little hint as to where land on the canvas. So, rather than set up shop, I decided to do some business and hopefully get some hints as to what to try next.

I started with Timeless Frames. I ordered mat board, and priced frames and talked about setting up a solo show there in the next couple of months. The work that is up there is work from the BAA that has been up since last month. So, no new work to see.

From there, I went back to downtown Rochester to RiverStones Framing and Gallery. A colleague told me that the owner would be interested in showing the BAA so I wore my Show Coordinator cap, and strolled in. Kris was very receptive and marked us on her calendar for July. As I was chatting with her, Ross Bachelder showed up to hang his show, and the three of us discussed an upcoming show at Drift Gallery at Zev Yoga, a solo by my dear colleague, Jeannie Griffin-Peterka. That’s an opening that I am hoping to not miss.

Ross’ opening at RiverStone’s, 33 North Main Street, Rochester, NH will be next Saturday, from 12-3.

I drove to Dover, and artstream wasn’t open.

Mill River Custom Framing & Art Gallery no longer shows art, but it was “old home week” because I showed with Sandi when her shop was in the Rollinsford Mills. We had a good chat.

(Can you see where this is going…)

Next stop was Michaels for foam core. As per usual, I always seem to be asked a technical question when I am in the store, and today David needed to know what gel medium was. I happened to be looking at canvases, in the same aisle. Timing is everything.

Nahcotta gave me something to look at, though I can’t gush about much that I saw. I do like Jeremy Miranda’s work, so I’ll start there.

"Waves of Winter" (c)Jeremy Miranda, oil on canvas, at Nahcotta

“Waves of Winter” (c)Jeremy Miranda, oil on canvas, at Nahcotta

Because I “borrowed” this image from Pinterest, I can’t enlarge it much further without distorting it completely out of recognition. I don’t like all of his work but where he rips away a wall to these really homey, pleasant spaces, exposing them to something a great deal less comfortable I find to be captivating. They brilliantly describe how vulnerable everything is without taking out the floor or the roof. And, I love how quiet they are.

Who knows what’s going on with this depicted Christmas. I come from an alcoholic family, where Christmas could really be ugly, when I was growing up. Or not. But, I can relate to those waves. As a child, I never really knew how rough the surf would be.

I will cut Nahcotta “slack” because this really is off-season, but the rest of the show was “off”-not hung as well as they usually present work, and didn’t have any real flow.

But, I saw art.

I also stopped at the Portsmouth Library to get info on who to contact for the BAA shows, and the librarian was lovely and gave me a few more suggestions as to who in Portsmouth to contact.

The final stop was the Levy Gallery (NHAA). I never saw all of the SHAPES show because I was instantly drawn into the side gallery when I noticed two pieces by my compadre Elaine Mendzela on the wall. She is one of the new members. When I came back to the main gallery, I was caught up in conversation with Barbara Alberts, who is also a new member. Barbara is a new transplant from Pittsburgh, and is now a new friend.

So, a day about reconnecting and connecting and new connections.

That’s art, too.

 

 

 

 

Fall to Earth, and Edward Jones openings this week-end

Jean Coughlin discusses Blackbird Studios with a woman interested in joining.

Jean Coughlin discusses Blackbird Studios with a woman interested in joining the collaborative.

I had two show openings this week-end.

The one at Edward Jones in Kittery, Maine is a part of a satellite program of the KAA, and I have 6 pieces there that will hang until April, 2015. https://www.facebook.com/kitteryartassociation?fref=photo for more information-and there is a picture of three of the artists (including me) and the curator, Judy Bryant.

“Fall to Earth” is the last regular show at Blackbird, and runs through December 7. This collective of 15 artists produces in my estimation, the best work in the area. There is no lack of variety, ingenuity, or experimentation. The work is on the grounds as well as inside. I have 9 framed pieces and around 30 unframed pieces as well as painted light switch plates and beaded handbags available  for purchase.

Our opening receptions have also included live music. Since we had a brief period of rain yesterday, the Rogue Town Managers moved inside. When the rain stopped, they moved back outside to entertain those seated under two tents.

The Rogue Town Managers during the downpour.

The Rogue Town Managers during the downpour. The red canvas in the upper left is mine.

The gallery hours are 11-6, Wednesday-Sunday. You might also catch prints being pulled off the flatbed press, an installation being mapped out, an artist being interviewed for MODspoke, a local e-zine, as well. 387 Somersworth Rd. (Rte. 9), North Berwick, Maine.

 

 

 

 

Upcoming shows opening June 6th

I am included in two group shows that open on June 6. “Art in Bloom” is at the Kittery Art Association in Kittery, Maine and “Local Heroes” is at artstream studios, in Dover, NH.

"Winn", MM on canvas 16"x 20". 2014 (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

“Winn”, MM on canvas 16″x 20″. 2014 (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, at artstream, Dover, NH 

"From the Wood", 2014. (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, oil and oil pastel on canvas.

“From the Wood”, 2014. (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, oil and oil pastel on canvas. In the “Art in Bloom” show, Kittery Art Association.