Category Archives: museum

Rochester Public Library’s contribution

The Rochester Museum of Fine Art owes much to the area libraries since we own nothing more than art. And, what a great thing to own-but only if you have a place to put it up!! We are getting more permanent space at the Gafffney Library.

I stopped at the RPL, hoping to map out my next show there, as well as to see the show on the 1st floor, and the new show at the  Carnegie Gallery, on the 2nd.

First, the student show on the 1st floor is superb!!

Gabe Pare's wire sculpture

Gabe Pare’s wire sculpture

I was really taken by this piece, but there are really nice 2-d pieces that just didn’t photo well of because of lighting. Really nice, Spaulding High School!!

Upstairs, in the Carnegie Gallery, we just hung Benjamin Cook.

(c)Benjamin Cook, "Untitled"We also have more of his work for the Carnie Medical window.

More pop-ups will happen soon!! Benjamin Cook is next!

New r.mfa stuff

We have made really great strides since I was asked to join the Curatorial Committee last June. Huge strides!!

Almost two weeks ago, I assisted in the relocation of some of the permanent exhibit from a storage locker to the Community Center in Rochester, New Hampshire. Amy Regan, Matt Wyatt and I also changed the shows at the Goodwin Library, in Farmington, NH and the the Rochester City Hall, in Rochester, NH.

This week we announced our Short Film series which will show at the Rochester Opera House next month.

http://rochestermfa.org/

Benjamin Cook goes up in the Carnegie Gallery in the Rochester Library tomorrow.

And, tomorrow I am among the jurors for the International Biennial 2015. That will be hung in the Carnegie Gallery in June.

More to come!!

r.mfa at the Rochester Community Center, Rochester, NH

r.mfa at the Rochester Community Center, Rochester, NH

 

Anne Vaughan, Sole City and turning 60

"Rose Window", (c) Anne Vaughan, oil on canvas.

“Rose Window”, (c) Anne Vaughan, oil on canvas.

I turned 60 today. I am not where I planned to be but in many ways, though where I am didn’t exist when I made those plans.

I never planned to be the Show Coordinator for an art association. And, this is a fun gig.

I also never planned to have other people’s work at my house prior to a show. Damn. I always want to buy it!!

Anne Vaughan entrusted two of her pieces with me for our next show-here’s “Rose Window”.  Anne’s work has the energy that beats most modern painters. This grandmother, a retired lawyer, and ex-museum docent, has a powerful, confident mark. Influenced by Delaunay, and the second wave of European Impressionists, she is highly adept at florals, landscapes and abstracts. Her most recent work delves into the socio-political with portraits of abused women, war victims, racially-triggered violence, etc.

I met Anne at the Red Saturday (BAA) event last year. She worked on a piece, and  set it down to dry. A child subsequently stepped on it, and for her, a “no big deal”.  She also sold a piece out of the parking lot later.

She will have this and another piece at Sole City this month. This group show will consist of work of mine, Anne Vaughan, Ruth Ann Bleau, Bill Moore, Beth Wittenberg, Christy Bruna, Erika Carty, Jim Munro and others. I will be hanging this show and pulling my own tomorrow afternoon.

 

Art at the Rochester Public Library, Rochester, NH for the rest of January, 2015

This whole corridor of southeastern Maine and New Hampshire, including the Berwicks, York and Kittery in Maine, and Dover, Somersworth, Rollinsford, and Rochester in New Hampshire have literally come alive since I moved back to the area in 2005. I have become very involved in two of the art associations, and the I am Show Coordinator for one, as well as on the curatorial board of the Rochester Museum of Fine Art.

The area has not kept up with gallery creation, and the economy still doesn’t support that kind of a venture without a “safety net”, but there are many great supportive venues like the libraries in the area.

I have shown five times at the Rochester Library in the new wing, where Peggy Trout arranges monthly shows with local artists and art groups. The old wing, or the Carnegie wing, displays some of the permanent collection of the Rochester Museum of Fine Art on the main floor. The Carnegie Gallery on the 2nd floor, is where the rotating and borrowed exhibits are hung.

Beth Wittenberg is on display on the main floor. Beth is a very active member of the Berwick Art Association and also a member of Blackbird Studio and Gallery, so we have shared lots of walls together. Beth and I also share a very special connection with art-making, where it seems neither of us have to rely on a muse, inspiration or even a good cup of coffee to need to make art.

works at the Rochester Public Library,(c)Beth Wittenberg

works at the Rochester Public Library,(c)Beth Wittenberg

What I love about Beth’s work is there is always more than meets the eye. In these pieces from 2013 and 2014,  she works very splattered and loose watercolor abstracts into pen-ink fantasy characters, that have color. As an abstract painter, I get lost in looking at the paint below the ink, and then float back to the finished work, appreciating it on multiple levels.

Upstairs, in the Carnegie Gallery are a collection of Dawn Boyer’s oils. Until I brush on my critiquing skills, I will respond as I have to Beth’s-as it relates to my work. Though she is responding to florals, I am looking beyond that again at paint and color. The brush work is solid and experienced. There isn’t hesitation. Nor, is there any immaturity in the palette-it is also self-assured.

Carnegie Gallery, (c) Dawn Boyer

Carnegie Gallery, Rochester Museum of Fine Art, (c) Dawn Boyer

Both of these shows will be up through the end of the month.

And, I will probably need to expand the corridor as I described it because I have been invited to show at the Gafney Library in Sanbornville, New Hampshire next month. Another 20 miles north of here.

 

 

Challenges, timelines and pure exhaustion

Thanksgiving week was all about prep for Red Saturday, the Berwick Art Association art fair and the hanging of the Sole City show. And, to make all of that happen, I took the end of my vacation time to make sure it did.

Now, in the meantime I met a very nice man online who lives an hour away…oh yeah, and did I mention the snowstorm that arrived on Thanksgiving Eve…I think by now you are getting the point. The vacation time was not a guarantee that I would see the Escher show at the Currier with George, make lots of wonderful product that would sell, and actually have a day or two to goof off.

Actually the part that DID happen was making lots of good product. All of that product will go to Blackbird Studios on Saturday. (When I define something as “product”, I am talking about wares other than pure fine art.) I finished a number of hand-beaded purses this last week.

Blue brocade bag, hand-beaded embellishments, satin lining

Blue brocade bag, hand-beaded embellishments, satin lining

The wear-and-tear of an art fair is tiring at best. Ten hours and the boiler in the building was out. Back to the snowstorm that made it impossible for a lot of this area to cook on Thanksgiving…so they had their turkey when we had our fair.

The snowstorm kept me from physically meeting my friend, much less seeing the exhibit.

Sunday, I felt like I had worked. But, the car  needed to be unloaded and reloaded to hang the Sole City show, the gem of the year.

Monday, that show went up-and quickly! Joanne, who arranges their shows, was a tremendous help and I am so excited to see all of this work up together. By late Monday afternoon, I felt like that milestone birthday I am approaching is real.

Sole City, hallway looking east

Sole City, hallway looking east

And, I am gearing up for my 2nd show as the Show Coordinator of the BAA-that opening is on Friday.

Erin Duquette thinks I have five clones, and I want to find one for a back massage.

Happy art making!

“Fire Dancer” (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

This painting is being reviewed by the Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Oregon, for its permanent collection.

"Fire Dancer", (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, watercolor, acrylic, oil pastel.

“Fire Dancer”, (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, watercolor, acrylic, oil pastel.

The art/fun of curating

My youngest sister is a curator.  A well-recognized one in Native American art. For the Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Oregon.

When she walked into my apartment for her visit, the first thing she said was, “Wow, look at the art!” My work, as well as a few choice pieces that I have traded for fill my walls. I like art-a lot of art-other people’s as well as my own.

I have hung many of my own shows, and I have argued with a gallery owners. I don’t always get my way. I have also been involved with art coops and associations where I have been part of the hanging committee. Last year, I curated the art at the Stone Church, which actually involved studio visits, and the like.

I have two shows to orchestrate the hanging of coming up. I will have a team for both shows, and both shows will be 40-70 pieces strong, 15-16 artists. I am getting images for press releases and the art is very solid!

So, I am not really curating, but I am managing a group of accomplished artists at the Kittery Art Association. And, I have taken on the responsibility of making sure that not one, but two shows, are good. It’s one thing to have good work to hang, it’s another to hang a good show.

I will be showcasing throughout the next few months, much of the art for both “Mettle” shows at the York Library and the Kittery Art Association gallery. As we get closer, I will also post any related events, opening dates, etc. But, right now, I am into the fun of curating—and that is sharing art.

"Harvest Moon", 2013 (c) Anne Strout. Mixed-media, encaustic.

“Harvest Moon”, 2013 (c) Anne Strout. Mixed-media, encaustic.

Anne refuses to work in mediums that aren’t challenging. She carries her wax pieces in temp-controlling lined bags so they don’t melt.

“Mettle”, the Seacoast Moderns at the York Library, September 3-October 27.

Stay tuned for more info—and a lot more images.

Making the best of an odd situation

I am the master of taking something totally unexpected and making it work. I guess that comes from growing up in a reasonably dysfunctional household where some things were not in the general script, and I learned how to “wing” it.

Friday night, I met someone at the Portland Museum of Art, so we could share what was on display. Once we were through with the Paley collection, he announced that he can only do two hours of art, and had other things he needed to take care of. I am a sponge for good art, and realized as we took in the Picassos and Matisses, how somewhat starved I was for this kind of visual stimulation. I flatly stated that I was going to stay and see what was on the 2nd and 3rd floor. My departing date gave me permission, like I needed it. (I don’t think I’ll see this person again.)

So, I went upstairs to see the permanent collection of work which is primarily from the Impressionism through contemporary. Refreshing! I’d like to note here that though this museum may pale in stature to the MFA in Boston, it is comparable in quality.

On to the third floor, where, when I saw the huge Ellsworth Kelly, I decided a little documentation was in order. I found a docent who I asked about the photo policy. This museum has a policy that allows non-flash photography of work that belongs to the museum, and the name card have an icon which shows which ones are not. Unfortunately the Kelly is not theirs, and the Louise Nevelson photo was out of focus.

The young docent had also told me that the Paley Collection could be photographed even though it was on loan from MoMA. So, after taking a couple more quick ones upstairs, I went back down to the main floor.

The Guitar, Pablo Picasso @ The Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine

The Guitar, Pablo Picasso @ The Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine

Burghers of Calais (miniature), August Rodin @ The Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine.

Burghers of Calais (miniature), August Rodin @ The Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine.

These are both from the “Taste for Modernism” exhibit.

And, on the third floor is this remarkable piece called “Books in the Running Brook”, Alison HIldreth. This is part of their permanent collection. My only problem with this piece is where it is hung. It is impossible to take in the full impact looking directly straight at it.

Books in the Running Brooks

After I departed the museum, I still wasn’t done. And, I shot a few photos, thus creating a little art of my own…

Lampost in Portland, (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

Lampost in Portland, (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

I made it a good night!!