Category Archives: New hampshire

The battle goes on, but it feels like I’m winning this time

Imperfection 1

I was diagnosed with Small Cell Carcinoma in October. There have been chemo and radiation therapies since. Last Sunday, I slept from 2PM on with the help of one of my anti-nausea meds. The last several days I have been up until after 9, my old bedtime.

A week ago I dropped off “Imperfection” (above) to the Harlow Gallery, easily a two hour drive from here. And, two hours to return. I was not up to that kind of a drive. Today, it might have been more fun.

Today, I also thought about a proposal that could go to 3S and Space. And, I continue to think about it though I haven’t put pen to paper yet. I worked on the next two of the “Imperfection” series, both of which are larger than the one at Harlow.

And, here I am.

The Rochester Library show went up last week, which incorporates most of what I have completed since I was diagnosed.

Holding It Together

“Holding It Together 1” demonstrates another of the artistic concerns that I have embraced recently. Both this series and the “Imperfection” series are monochromatic. These, however, utilize a myriad of materials that are either painted to approximate the color of the canvas or inherently are a similar shade.

Hommage to the Surrealists

“Homage to the Surrealists” uses no paint. The native color of the materials is what is important, along with the textures and translucency.

So, along with a renewed interest in Photoshop, which I also purchased this week, I am exploring my best in 2-D art.

 

 

 

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“Real”

Aside from watercolor portraits, I am starting a large installation piece entitled “Real”. The premise behind it is that all 2-D art has a semblance of reality, and everything I put on canvas reflects mine. I had originally thought that these pieces would all have a direct relationship to my “cancer pieces”. That would be ridiculous since so much of my life has nothing to do with being sick.

So, there will be an element of randomness about the series that will make up the installation. I sat down today to work on another abstract  and ended up painting a small portrait of David Bowie. In a very mysterious number of ways, that makes so much sense. His album “Blackstar” was released today, and he would have been 70 also today. Blackstar is a type of cancer lesion. He died of liver cancer. (Blackstar is associated with breast cancer.)

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“In the Name of Progress”, and my solo this month

In the Name of Progress

This is finished just in time for my show this month at the Franklin Gallery, in RiverStones Framing at 33 No. Main Street in Rochester, NH called “Transitions and Transmissions”.

To me, this image speaks volumes about how progress has left so much of our past literally in the dust. So much about the context of this is wrong. Where’s the farm? It’s parked on the side of US 202 in Maine. The flat tire and the chains in the middle of summer also adds to the story.

The collection that will be included is half abstracts and half pieces similar to this one.

I hope you can stop by for the opening reception on August 11, from 5-7.

Since March??

OK, this is pathetic. I haven’t posted anything in almost four months.

It has been a weird year so far, and I’m not going to make any further excuses. There are lots of changes on the horizon, and I’ve been concentrating on trying to meld ideas and paint. And, I am no longer trying to make it make sense. A change is just that.

The new work was not spawned but reinforced by two commissions, and a sale of two other realistic watercolors.

Below is Chris’ first piece which, when I delivered it,  responded with “That’s f–king awesome!” Guess he liked it. And, enough that I am finishing up another one for him which I will deliver next week.

So, with this bit of prompting, I am revisiting this kind of work. As long as it involves a paint brush and paint.

Milton Auto Works almost

Black Ground series

This is an update of the Black Grounds, now named Jealousy and Fear. There are still some possible finishing touches on both but I am pretty comfortable.

Black Ground-FearBlack Ground-Jealousy.JPG

“Pacific Suite, Ojai is Calling”

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This image says a lot about me.

Home is California. Tribal home may be Ojai, though I am not entirely sure of that. I just know when I am there, it feels like home.

It’s painterly, and geometric. Bright, but I also can work really complex color.

Still in progress. Oil on unprimed canvas. 108’X 69″

“Fancy Parade and Other Recent Work”, opening reception, update

This will give you a sense of scale of the newest work. “Untarnished Symphony” is 98″ x 69″. I’m short at 5’1″, but still, they are quite large.

The opening reception was small, but pleasant-attended mostly by friends, and a few of the faculty and students.

I would now like to use this show as a place to talk to galleries in the area. It is up through April 28th at Great Bay Community College in Portsmouth, NH. Please feel free to contact me at artinsmallplaces@gmail.com.

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“Fancy Parade” and other recent work

I Cried About Paris. Twice. finished

The featured piece for this show by Great Bay Community College is “I Cried About Paris. Twice”, shown above. This piece is 36″ x 48″, and oil on canvas. The tragedy in November was the catalyst for this piece. It also felt very close to “home” since my sister had been in this part of Paris less than 4 months before.

There is no piece in this show smaller than 48″ x 24″, so I am saying that this is the largest show I have ever put up, even though there are only 13 pieces total.

The title piece and one companion are both on unstretched canvas and are mounted mush like tapestries. “Fancy Parade”, 98″ x 69″ is shown here:

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Both of these pieces are examples of what the college refers to as my “fearless use of color”. They also demonstrate the two predominant styles in the show. These larger pieces need to be treated with thin paint because of the instability of the painted surface. However, more expressive stretched canvases are worked primarily with a knife.

The inspiration for “Fancy Parade” and “Untarnished Symphony” is the celebration of life and color. I recently also lost my mother and an old dear friend. They are memorialized in the two “Pacific Suite” pieces. I also just heard that a good friend’s brother has passed-I may pay a small tribute to him in the same way.

Sandpiper and Santa Barbara

This is “Pacific Suite: Sandpiper and Santa Barbara”, 36″ x 48″, oil on canvas.

This show is up through April 29th, with an opening reception on March 10, from 5-7. Gateway Gallery is located in the main foyer of Great Bay Community College, 320 Corporate Drive, Portsmouth, NH 03801. The public is welcome to visit during college hours (see their website) and to attend the reception which will be catered by the Green Bean Restaurant.

Please also feel free to visit my website at dadartthurst.com

 

 

Vindication

This interview of my feelings about the porn site theft feels like vindication:

I NEVER EXPECTED people I called friends to accuse me of “needing their attention”. Really.

I NEVER EXPECTED  people I know to accuse me to have put it there: Really.

Most of the accusations were eventually apologized for, but I know who to trust now.

And, all of this never touches on the much larger issue, which was discussed in the interview: the vulnerability we all have on the internet.

http://www.seacoastonline.com/article/20150420/NEWS/150429956/101164/ENTERTAINMENT

Thank you Jeanne’.

 

 

Mills and Mills

The region is dotted with many old and no longer operational water-powered paper and pulp mills. Brick factory buildings are also easily found. This part of New England has a strong history in a huge variety of manufacturing and other types of production-related businesses from the original Frank Jones Brewery complex in downtown Portsmouth, to the Button Factory on the other side of Islington. The Schultz meat plant is geographically right between the two. And, is decaying, where the other two now house an athletic club and artist studios, respectively.

The Schultz factory, Mat House Annex side (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

The Schultz factory, Malt House Annex side (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

I asked a friend of mine who is very involved in Portsmouth New Hampshire politics (where I am sure this is a terrific embarrassment), and the owner seems to have no motivation to clean it up and make it serviceable to businesses, artists, etc. What a shame!!

And, I actually find that whole idea extremely short-sighted considering what the Button Factory charges for studio space, and the last time I checked they were full!! http://www.buttonfactorystudios.com/studio_availability.htm

I have friends who have studios in the 1 Washington Street Mill Building in Dover, New Hampshire. This is a multi-use building that serves a myriad of businesses like Terra Cotta Pasta, a few smaller galleries, framing studios, apparel retailers, and other concerns. Dover has at least three complexes that are all successful in renting to those who need space but maybe don’t need the street-level, strip mall type exposure.

The Rollinsford Mill is very much like the 1 Washington Street Mill except it is heavily rented as art studio space. They, like the Button Factory, host open-studio events where the public is invited to come and experience the art at the Mill and purchase it outside the pretty gallery setting, directly from the artists.

In my travels taking pictures and just reveling in the spring sunshine, I drove (for no reason) to Sanford, Maine. In Sanford, there is a mill complex that looks a lot like the Schultz Factory.

the empty Sanford Mills building (c) DA Dartt Hurst

the empty Sanford Mills building (c) DA Dartt Hurst

No apparent recon is going on with this site, yet it is on a terrific piece of property with a great view. I took a few minutes to walk along this side of the building, and the front and shot this for art.

Sanford Mill venting, (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

Sanford Mill venting, (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

But, I wasn’t through wandering-the weather was not allowing this cabin-fevered child to be inside all day!

I went home, and lost the New Balance and socks to Tevas. Yes, and toes are happy! But, I was not done finding new treasures.

Gonic is a non-incorporated town that is really part of Rochester, but, like East Rochester, there is a different personality. I got here quite by accident, and found another mill building. But one I didn’t know about. And, one that has been restored, but hasn’t become trendy yet. Uh-oh!

This one has huge spaces, and though I haven’t seen them yet, they could be possibly rented as a group and sub-divided. Rents are crazy-cheap! Like they should be for a studio!

Gonic Mill, with the Cocheco River (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

Gonic Mill, with the Cocheco River (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst