Category Archives: New hampshire

Press release for Timeless and the Rochester Library

The next couple of months will be very big for the visual arts in the area. Events are starting to overlap, and I can only be in so many places at once!!

This is my contribution to artwork offerings.

Timeless and Rochester Library press release

I hope all can attend!

Size matters

I saw the work at the Carnegie Gallery by the South African artist Marsi van de Huevel yesterday. The Carnegie Gallery is an amazing little art oasis in Rochester, New Hampshire in the Rochester Public Library, which is curated by the Rochester Museum of Fine Art. I am a member of the board and proud to be representing this incredible work.

 

"The Moon", (c)Marsi van de Huevel, giclee, but the original is graphite.

“The Moon”, (c)Marsi van de Huevel, giclee, but the original is graphite.

First, there is the medium. This work is painstakingly produced with pen and ink. Incredibly time-consuming.

Secondly, larger than “sketchbook scale” here is also presented.  Scale in some mediums isn’t questioned. It used to be, “the bigger the more important”, because, well, it’s harder to ignore. So bigger oils and acrylics are now often dismissed just BECAUSE of size, meaning that rule really doesn’t apply to painting unless they really deserve the size. That rule has been around for decades.

Dry mediums and watercolor are usually not presented in a larger format, nor are pen and inks, which is why van de Huevel’s and work I need to revisit at The Gallery at 100 Market Street are important. It is time we challenge what can be large, and ignore the framing!

To be continued…

Busy, and the Gafney opening was perfect

I was trying to post daily, and I got really good at posting something…

and then this last period happened…

so, here I am again, to show off today, and the opening reception at the Gafney.

I loved today. A perfect flow where everything actually made sense. Huh?

I delivered 2 pieces to the Gallery at 100 Market, and the curator was there early, knowing I needed to be in Sanbornville at 9:30. Amazingly, I got to the Gafney much earlier than I expected. So, the food display was artful, too.

My compadre, Steffanie Antonio was there right after 10. That really set the pace for the reception! Anne and Niles showed up not 10 minutes later…

Gabe Smith showed up in a HAZMAT suit, to so a performance at the Courier. Amy Regan is also here.

Gabe Smith showed up in a HAZMAT suit, to do a performance at the Courier. Amy Regan is also here.

As Anne Vaughan wanted a real tour, I needed to break for a whole new set of arrivals. I am waiting for the rest of the images that other people shot today, because once things got rolling, I “lost” my camera.

Steffanie Antonio's shot of me in front of "Truant's Holiday"

Steffanie Antonio’s shot of me in front of “Truant’s Holiday”

Amy Regan, who is one of the founders of the Rochester Museum of Fine Art came and we discussed not only some of my art-making history, but also some of the mechanics of this show, and how I work.

I guess for some, putting together a show this size might be a retro…for me, the oldest piece in the show is September of 2013. About 40 of the 49 pieces on display are from 2014.

It will be up through next Saturday-check for the library hours on their website.

 

snowstorms and other excuses

I wanted to document Neptune, except Nemo from two years ago seemed more exciting. So, been there…

My only excuse for not writing is the number of shows I am preparing for has kept me at the easel, and that’s not a bad excuse, but there is much to catch up on.

The Gallery at 100 Market was a huge focus of the week. Since all of my big recent work is in Sanbornville, I spent most of last weekend and the early part of the week finishing, shooting, and getting the submission ready for that deadline.

She took two pieces, no question.

"Mixed Precip and Hot Chocolate", (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, 2015,mixed media on paper.

“Mixed Precip and Hot Chocolate”, (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, 2015,mixed media on paper.

And…

"Fading Memories of Drama". (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, 2015, mixed media on paper.

“Fading Memories of Drama”. (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, 2015, mixed media on paper.

We had a major conversation about the newest work because it’s large, and as much as she wanted it, she needed to really look at space. Ah, the fine art of curation, and since I show at 100 Market regularly, and I want to show the Meez portraits together…we came to a mutual agreement that these would work for this show, and the rest can wait.

I am hoping at some point to get a featured slot there, because this is a great alternative space.

Nahcotta and Zev Yoga Show Openings tonight

There has been a deterioration of the “Art Around Town” circuit since 3 Graces closed. That was a sad day for many of us. But it was nice to see Kim Ferreira’s “Jackalopes” at Nahcotta tonight-a pleasant reminder that the reason why she closed her gallery was to devote more time to her art.

The decision to venture out tonight was because I am a fan, follower, and friend of Jeannie Griffin-Peterka, and I am proud to say she was my nomination for her solo at the r.mfa.  I needed to see this show. I support my artist friends and I love to see their new work. Her show was at Zev, the opening was 6.

“Art Around Town” starts at 5, and I was in town shortly after. I stuck my head in Kennedy Studios, took a peak and wandered down to Nahcotta. Fair warning-wear great snow footwear. Yikes! Walking was an interesting task!

Nahcotta’s “Enormous Tiny Art-Winter, Show #17” was a really nice change from what they had up last week, which really felt like…this is what we had in the backroom, with no cohesion at all…but we needed something on the walls. I know from having been in enough galleries in the last 38 years, that happens. January is a peculiar month. So, no fault to the gallery for that :).

There is some great work in this show, and based on the red-dots, the show is being well-received. I particularly liked Amanda Kavanaughs’ pieces and Kate Todaro “L3 to the Red Line” series.

"L3 to the Red Line", (c)Kate Todaro

“L3 to the Red Line”, (c)Kate Todaro

I cheated with the camera, because I noticed another person writing and capturing images on his phone. We actually ended up having a conversation about the show, and about what he felt was redeeming, etc. I did think it was fun to be not the only one doing this and Marc and I also shared some “big city” thoughts on the way art is reviewed.

From Nahcotta, I ice skated (not literally, but close), to Zev.  Jeannie was just taking her boots off at the door (it’s a yoga studio) when I walked in. I am a personal comrade, so all I am going to say here is “see this show”. All of her work is fairly large acrylic on canvas.  Her work is remarkable and some day I will own this piece:

"Number 27" (c)Jeannie Griffin-Peterka

“Number 27” (c)Jeannie Griffin-Peterka

There are small details in this painting that she doesn’t always include that I like. This piece almost feels like a cityscape, which grounds it, and I think that’s a quality that I am responding too, as well.

So, I am home and warm and expecting more snow, and then…more snow…with more snow. Perfect painting weather.

 

 

 

Largest show of mine to date: Gafney Library, Sanbornville, NH

I was given an opportunity to show as many as 60 pieces this month. I showed up with 49, and based on the images the curator sent me, that seems to have worked really well.

Since I also coordinate the shows for the Berwick Art Association, I needed to dash before the show was completely hung.

Here are some of the images that Peter sent down:

the main wall at Gafney including "Truant's Holiday"

the main wall at Gafney including “Truant’s Holiday”

"Catch the Sun" at Gafney

“Catch the Sun” at Gafney

This is a great show, and demonstrates much of what I explored artistically last year.

The opening reception is from 10-12, February 21st. Hope to see you all!

More art from last night

On to the Kittery Art Association, since I had a meeting of the Seacoast Moderns to attend there.

A drastic difference from 100 Market, not so much in quality of execution, but in depth. “Color Palette” offers a great deal of eye-candy. And, much like the “candy food group” is to the body, there is real no nutritional value  to the brain in this show.

This is another venue where I am a member and regularly show, as well. I joined this art association four years ago to have an outlet, and for many of us, it does provide that in a lovely two-story building on Kittery Point. I couldn’t make the drop-off for this show, since I was hanging the Berwick Art Association show at Sole City, at the same time. There are some very technically skillful members, which was also my “draw”. And, it is not nearly as expensive to be a member as the Ogunquit Art Association or the New Hampshire Art Association-though, they look better on the resume since you are juried into them. KAA has no jury process.

Here are a few of my “picks” from “Color Palette:

"Lost Claw" (c)Cleone Graham, oil on canvas

“Lost Claw” (c)Cleone Graham, oil on canvas

"Chip", (c) Max Johnson, MM

“Chip”, (c) Max Johnson, MM

"Kayax" (c)Jennifer Chamberlain, oil on canvas.

“Kayax” (c)Jennifer Chamberlain, oil on canvas.

As with the Gallery at 100 Market Street, the KAA shows are always very well-hung. Judith Bryant has a remarkable eye for making very diverse work, in medium, theme and quality, work together. And, she has no prior knowledge what she will have to work with until it arrives!

Not as challenging or thought-provoking as the Portsmouth show, but definitely worth the drive to Kittery Point his week-end.

The Kittery Art Association is located at 8 Coleman Avenue, Kittery Point, Maine. They are open from 12-6 on Saturdays and 12-5 on Sundays. http://www.kitteryartassociation.com

 

 

Art at the Rochester Public Library, Rochester, NH for the rest of January, 2015

This whole corridor of southeastern Maine and New Hampshire, including the Berwicks, York and Kittery in Maine, and Dover, Somersworth, Rollinsford, and Rochester in New Hampshire have literally come alive since I moved back to the area in 2005. I have become very involved in two of the art associations, and the I am Show Coordinator for one, as well as on the curatorial board of the Rochester Museum of Fine Art.

The area has not kept up with gallery creation, and the economy still doesn’t support that kind of a venture without a “safety net”, but there are many great supportive venues like the libraries in the area.

I have shown five times at the Rochester Library in the new wing, where Peggy Trout arranges monthly shows with local artists and art groups. The old wing, or the Carnegie wing, displays some of the permanent collection of the Rochester Museum of Fine Art on the main floor. The Carnegie Gallery on the 2nd floor, is where the rotating and borrowed exhibits are hung.

Beth Wittenberg is on display on the main floor. Beth is a very active member of the Berwick Art Association and also a member of Blackbird Studio and Gallery, so we have shared lots of walls together. Beth and I also share a very special connection with art-making, where it seems neither of us have to rely on a muse, inspiration or even a good cup of coffee to need to make art.

works at the Rochester Public Library,(c)Beth Wittenberg

works at the Rochester Public Library,(c)Beth Wittenberg

What I love about Beth’s work is there is always more than meets the eye. In these pieces from 2013 and 2014,  she works very splattered and loose watercolor abstracts into pen-ink fantasy characters, that have color. As an abstract painter, I get lost in looking at the paint below the ink, and then float back to the finished work, appreciating it on multiple levels.

Upstairs, in the Carnegie Gallery are a collection of Dawn Boyer’s oils. Until I brush on my critiquing skills, I will respond as I have to Beth’s-as it relates to my work. Though she is responding to florals, I am looking beyond that again at paint and color. The brush work is solid and experienced. There isn’t hesitation. Nor, is there any immaturity in the palette-it is also self-assured.

Carnegie Gallery, (c) Dawn Boyer

Carnegie Gallery, Rochester Museum of Fine Art, (c) Dawn Boyer

Both of these shows will be up through the end of the month.

And, I will probably need to expand the corridor as I described it because I have been invited to show at the Gafney Library in Sanbornville, New Hampshire next month. Another 20 miles north of here.

 

 

“Challenges”

I have offered myself up this new challenge of melding realism and abstraction. That will be ongoing.

Today, I decided to up-the-ante with a continual calendar of personal challenges, both art and personal, for 2015. Not big resolutions, but daily or weekly goals.

I have never been a great watercolor landscape painter, but there is no time like the present to practice.

"Quechee Gorge", 2014, watercolor on Arches, (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

“Quechee Gorge”, 2014, watercolor on Arches, (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

I also added to, and finished “Dinner for Two”.

"Dinner for Two", 2014, watercolor, oil and chalk pastel, (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

“Dinner for Two”, 2014, watercolor, oil and chalk pastel, (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

“Dinner for Two”

In my quest to assimilate the two rather disparate parts of my art portfolio. I can see things in life that might be well described this way, as well…

"Dinner for Two", watercolor and oil pastel, (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

“Dinner for Two”, watercolor and oil pastel,
(c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst