Category Archives: New York

New Hampshire and the arts, a quick opinion

I looked into grants a few months back, to discover the state is not offering any individual artist grants this year. But the state seems to now be realizing that art is a valuable component for economic growth and development.

http://www.seacoastonline.com/article/20150412/NEWS/150419843/101141/NEWS

And, as a Los Angeles ex-patriot, I know that to be very true. When the galleries and studios moved into the old garment district in downtown, the area totally turned around. What had once been an area where it was well-advised for a woman to never be alone, turned into an interesting, trendy area with an edge. The same thing has been happening in New York City for decades, as well.

Hopefully, they can find the nickels to help perpetuate that growth! Revitalization depends on it!!

This isn’t New York, but…

I can safely say that I saw some very high quality art today!! What a treat! And, I had “time to kill”, which as an artist means that I need to find something to draw on or, take in the answers others can give to you from their own visions. So, the perfect excuse!!

I have been meaning to get to the Gallery at 100 Market Street in Portsmouth to walk this show. I show here fairly often and the parameters of this show would have necessitated new work that I had no time to create. But, because I have a great respect for the curator and the quality of the work that she presents, I needed to make it a point to see “Guise, Garment and Textile”.

Steampunk Family, Astrida Schaiffer

Steampunk Family, Astrida Schaiffer

OK, I was hooked right here! The props and the photos of them on the “family” made it all too relevant. It almost felt like “Antiques Roadshow” where a participant shows up with the antique and all sorts of provenance.

David Mendelsohn is an acquaintance I very much admire, though he does push a feminist button or two with his work, when he eliminates heads and covers them with hat boxes.

David Mendelsohn's wall

David Mendelsohn’s wall

Dennis Perrin, "Watching for Swallows"

Dennis Perrin, “Watching for Swallows”

Denis Perrin’s work, including “Watching for Swallows” was so historically perfect I had to wonder if he was born 150 years ago. Style, paint and application was too incredibly European Impression, almost Berthe Morisot.

The 3rd floor belongs to Caroline Rufo. This articulate abstract craftswoman reinvents the likes of Richard Diebenkorn and all other painters who have taken their compositional inspiration from aerial photography. Her titles, like “Seeking Union” also allude to architecture and building, in the emotional sense.

"Seeking Union", (c) Caroline Rufo. Oil on board.

“Seeking Union”, (c) Caroline Rufo. Oil on board.

But, there is sometimes a sour note in a show this well executed. And, it is on the 4th floor, which tells me that it is good enough for the show, but maybe it needed to be on the 4th floor-for political reasons.

I am native American, so a piece like this entitled “The Raiding Party” was not a happy end. From purely aesthetic principles, a well-articulated and executed piece-but it smacks of knowing nothing of the Trail of Tears or any of the other atrocities that my people dealt with.

"The Raiding Party", (c)Debra Tillar, mixed media

“The Raiding Party”, (c)Debra Tillar, mixed media

Overall, this show is one of the best that Portsmouth has offered in a long time. And, since I am very pro First Amendment, I applaud all of the work in this show, whether or not I agree with politics or philosophy, because of the quality of the execution.

The Gallery at 100 Market Street in Portsmouth is open Monday-Friday on all 4 floors. The 3rd and 4th floors are not available on the week-ends. This show runs through mid-February.

 

 

Art Between the Eyes

Funny how the original intent of this post is actually catching up to me! And, finding me, as well. Win-win, as far as I am concerned.

For those that have read through the early posts, I was really trying to spotlight out-of-the way venues. But, I have 40 hr. gig and I am an artist, so the focus has evolved to be more me in these venues.

The Gatehouse Gallery actually contacted me in January of 2012. That initiated a fruitful relationship for both of us, professionally, as well as personally. (The most expensive piece Malynda has sold was mine).  New galleries in the North Country spring up all the time and are usually out-buildings restored and repurposed.  And, they need to be explored!!

Artists exist everywhere-and I keep getting knocked back by stuff I find in places where you would least expect it.  Many people with huge talent and major resumes move here to get away from New York, Boston, etc… There are some powerhouses like Bess Cutler at the Kittery Art Association.

I met George and Paula, from Art Between the Eyes Gallery  last month.  Genuinely warm and wonderful people, as most of the north country folk in NH are (I got lost today-and my faith in humanity is always refreshed in the north-I got directions from a stranger) on my way there. Paula and George and I talked for a fair length of time at the Gatehouse Gallery last month, but I was delighted to be asked to visit their little gallery with work. And, leave the work for them to sell.

Art between the Eyes

Art between the Eyes

 

 

Abte 4

 

I passed on shooting Malynda Roy Forcier’s work -basically because of where it is placed. (bad light for that time of day). But, she is there, too.

I want to say, “Who needs the New York art world?” A certain few artists, I guess??

 

Making the best of an odd situation

I am the master of taking something totally unexpected and making it work. I guess that comes from growing up in a reasonably dysfunctional household where some things were not in the general script, and I learned how to “wing” it.

Friday night, I met someone at the Portland Museum of Art, so we could share what was on display. Once we were through with the Paley collection, he announced that he can only do two hours of art, and had other things he needed to take care of. I am a sponge for good art, and realized as we took in the Picassos and Matisses, how somewhat starved I was for this kind of visual stimulation. I flatly stated that I was going to stay and see what was on the 2nd and 3rd floor. My departing date gave me permission, like I needed it. (I don’t think I’ll see this person again.)

So, I went upstairs to see the permanent collection of work which is primarily from the Impressionism through contemporary. Refreshing! I’d like to note here that though this museum may pale in stature to the MFA in Boston, it is comparable in quality.

On to the third floor, where, when I saw the huge Ellsworth Kelly, I decided a little documentation was in order. I found a docent who I asked about the photo policy. This museum has a policy that allows non-flash photography of work that belongs to the museum, and the name card have an icon which shows which ones are not. Unfortunately the Kelly is not theirs, and the Louise Nevelson photo was out of focus.

The young docent had also told me that the Paley Collection could be photographed even though it was on loan from MoMA. So, after taking a couple more quick ones upstairs, I went back down to the main floor.

The Guitar, Pablo Picasso @ The Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine

The Guitar, Pablo Picasso @ The Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine

Burghers of Calais (miniature), August Rodin @ The Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine.

Burghers of Calais (miniature), August Rodin @ The Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine.

These are both from the “Taste for Modernism” exhibit.

And, on the third floor is this remarkable piece called “Books in the Running Brook”, Alison HIldreth. This is part of their permanent collection. My only problem with this piece is where it is hung. It is impossible to take in the full impact looking directly straight at it.

Books in the Running Brooks

After I departed the museum, I still wasn’t done. And, I shot a few photos, thus creating a little art of my own…

Lampost in Portland, (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

Lampost in Portland, (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

I made it a good night!!

Surely I digress…

A quick post about art in very large places…

I am originally from southern California. I went to school there, too. With some rather talented people, I might add.

Recently, Jeffrey Vallance showed at the Andy Warhol Museum in New York. I remember his mini-installation pieces right outside the art building. I also remember being seriously aggravated by a graffiti piece that he and two of his friends put up in the painting studio. But, he has gone on to show internationally and I can say that I at least shared that space with his energy. We didn’t have any studio classes together.

Last week, Robert Piser opened at the James Gray Gallery in Santa Monica. Bob and I did have  a class together at Reseda High with Mr. Gill.

I won’t comment on Vallance because that’s been covered. And, having not seen Bob’s stuff up close, I am only going to make a few really general comments.

I have read a few of the comments on his Facebook page that compare Piser to a few well-known pop artists. I would disagree. I think Bob knows late 40s and 50s LA and puts it out there, better than any that I have seen. They are very derivative of that period’s advertising. And, unfortunately, that is all I can say-my 15″ monitor screen doesn’t deliver good enough imagery and…there is nothing like seeing art on the wall.

Thanks to them and to all who make art. Good job.