Category Archives: Rochester Museum of Fine Art

Rochester Public Library’s contribution

The Rochester Museum of Fine Art owes much to the area libraries since we own nothing more than art. And, what a great thing to own-but only if you have a place to put it up!! We are getting more permanent space at the Gafffney Library.

I stopped at the RPL, hoping to map out my next show there, as well as to see the show on the 1st floor, and the new show at the  Carnegie Gallery, on the 2nd.

First, the student show on the 1st floor is superb!!

Gabe Pare's wire sculpture

Gabe Pare’s wire sculpture

I was really taken by this piece, but there are really nice 2-d pieces that just didn’t photo well of because of lighting. Really nice, Spaulding High School!!

Upstairs, in the Carnegie Gallery, we just hung Benjamin Cook.

(c)Benjamin Cook, "Untitled"We also have more of his work for the Carnie Medical window.

More pop-ups will happen soon!! Benjamin Cook is next!

New r.mfa stuff

We have made really great strides since I was asked to join the Curatorial Committee last June. Huge strides!!

Almost two weeks ago, I assisted in the relocation of some of the permanent exhibit from a storage locker to the Community Center in Rochester, New Hampshire. Amy Regan, Matt Wyatt and I also changed the shows at the Goodwin Library, in Farmington, NH and the the Rochester City Hall, in Rochester, NH.

This week we announced our Short Film series which will show at the Rochester Opera House next month.

http://rochestermfa.org/

Benjamin Cook goes up in the Carnegie Gallery in the Rochester Library tomorrow.

And, tomorrow I am among the jurors for the International Biennial 2015. That will be hung in the Carnegie Gallery in June.

More to come!!

r.mfa at the Rochester Community Center, Rochester, NH

r.mfa at the Rochester Community Center, Rochester, NH

 

Press release for Timeless and the Rochester Library

The next couple of months will be very big for the visual arts in the area. Events are starting to overlap, and I can only be in so many places at once!!

This is my contribution to artwork offerings.

Timeless and Rochester Library press release

I hope all can attend!

Censorship, and why “fuck” is only OK in some places

First of all, I am speaking as Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, artist and photographer. I have affiliations, boards that I serve on, etc. I am speaking for none of them-I am speaking for me here. So, please let none of these opinions fall back on any of those relationships.

The idea of censorship as a topic actually crossed my desk last week in an article that ran in the Washington Post online that dealt with Facebook. Let’s start here.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-intersect/wp/2015/03/09/facebook-censored-a-nude-painting-and-it-could-change-the-site-forever/

This is art, fine art, art that has been revered for more than a century. Art that is academically accepted. Museum art. Art that changed ways that we think about…art. And, what can be exhibited. What is acceptable. As nauseum.

Facebook censored this image, claiming that it was not acceptable for “grandma”. OK. Is grandma reading every site posting art? Out of the zillion sites, is every one being visited by “grandma”? I have to tell you, I did a bit of a “stalk” on a few of a friend’s site (don’t we all-but I was looking at art), and there was outright huge pornography on one. Huge-no questions-a penis in the vagina type.

So, I am confused as to who determines what is acceptable on Facebook.

The local issue is less of who, but more about why.

Beth Wittenberg recently was asked by the Rochester Museum of Fine Art to be the first to display in a venue in downtown Rochester, New Hampshire. The storefront on Main Street, that used to be Carney Medical’s has been given over to the museum for temporary displays, known as “pop ups”.

Now, I’ll give you a little background on the museum. It is a total voluntary operation. We have little financial support-and yes, I did switch “person”, because I am on the Curatorial Board. We are basically a self-governed concern except when it comes to our displays. We use any decent space given to us, and the Carney space availed itself to something new. The libraries, Community Center and Town Hall have set parameters regarding nudity, violence, profanity, etc.

Because the Carney space is new for us, the decision was to relax the restrictions. This turned out to not be what that concern was comfortable with, so we were asked to pull the offending work.

The result has been a railing by the presenting artist, as well as other artists in the area, against the museum.

The Carney Mediacla storefront

The Carney Mediacla storefront

So, here we are. A museum with no owned real estate, trying to present what we can, and pushing as many envelops as we can too. In this case, we went a bit too far. So, here’s the why.  Because we don’t own it, we have to bow to the owners.

The blame of censorship needs to go elsewhere, in this case, as well as the cry that the museum should not have pulled this show.

I, as an artist, hate this. I want to say what the fuck I want and when the fuck I want to say it. And HOWEVER the fuck I need to do that. But, the museum has to do this-because, again, this is borrowed real estate.

And, as the Show Coordinator of the Berwick Art Association, every time I hang one of our shows in a local library or school, you best believe, there will be no “fuck” in any of the pieces I hang. Again, not my choice if it were my walls, but they are family walls. As a rep of the BAA…”fuck” ain’t OK here, either.

 

 

Size matters

I saw the work at the Carnegie Gallery by the South African artist Marsi van de Huevel yesterday. The Carnegie Gallery is an amazing little art oasis in Rochester, New Hampshire in the Rochester Public Library, which is curated by the Rochester Museum of Fine Art. I am a member of the board and proud to be representing this incredible work.

 

"The Moon", (c)Marsi van de Huevel, giclee, but the original is graphite.

“The Moon”, (c)Marsi van de Huevel, giclee, but the original is graphite.

First, there is the medium. This work is painstakingly produced with pen and ink. Incredibly time-consuming.

Secondly, larger than “sketchbook scale” here is also presented.  Scale in some mediums isn’t questioned. It used to be, “the bigger the more important”, because, well, it’s harder to ignore. So bigger oils and acrylics are now often dismissed just BECAUSE of size, meaning that rule really doesn’t apply to painting unless they really deserve the size. That rule has been around for decades.

Dry mediums and watercolor are usually not presented in a larger format, nor are pen and inks, which is why van de Huevel’s and work I need to revisit at The Gallery at 100 Market Street are important. It is time we challenge what can be large, and ignore the framing!

To be continued…