Blog Archives

Anne Vaughan at the Berwick Library

This woman is really amazing.

She is a retired attorney who produces artwork like she has been an art pro all of here life. And, doesn’t stagger or falter at any change in subject.

She is not on Facebook other than to do family things and uses social media sparingly otherwise, and since I am a big fan…I told her I would put her out her in social media land.

Anne at the Berwick Library shows the full range (though honestly, I wish I had helped her hang the show) of her brilliance. Her piece, called “The Refugee” brought tears.

"The Refugee" (c) Anne Vaughan, oil on canvas

“The Refugee” (c) Anne Vaughan, oil on canvas

This show will be up through the end of the month.  Her opening reception is April 21, from 5-7 at the Berwick Library,Berwick, Maine.

Here is her statement:

I have been painting in oils for some years, but my work has increased since

I retired to lovely rural Maine, to be near children, in 2010, with my husband Niles

Schore. Maine has lots of family history for me: I have four wonderful daughters

(all born in Maine) and my four grandchildren, all who live in New England. My

father’s family is from Bowdoinham. My childhood was spent in Texas, but I

spent my high school years in Massachusetts as a farmer’s daughter on a dairy

farm.

Before my 2010 retirement, I worked as an attorney for legal services

programs in Pennsylvania, representing my clients in need of services and

supports. My last employment was providing constituent services for Pennsylvania

Congressman Joe Sestak. I loved the work I was able to do in both jobs. I also

served as a docent for the Philadelphia Museum of Art, designing and giving

tours to our visitors throughout our museum for 10 years. This too was a highly

rewarding volunteer occupation.

I have had a life-long love of art and art history and painting, and now in

retirement I have the chance to indulge this love in my own works. I belonged

to two art groups in Pennsylvania, and now I am a member of and have enjoyed

exhibiting with our local Berwick Art Association, Kittery Art Association and

the Seacoast Moderns and the York Art Association, and our own local Blackbird

Studio and Gallery. In addition to participation in these shows I have displayed my

paintings at Ben Franklin, Second Landing, Poppy Seed, Sarah Orne Jewett House,

University of Southern Maine, and in libraries in Rochester, Dover, Somersworth,

North Berwick and Durham.

My art work varies in subject and treatment, from landscapes to still lifes

to abstracts and family portraits and works with a political theme influenced by

my work as an advocate for disadvantaged people as well as reflecting on current

world events. I look forward to the continuing expansion of the art community in

our region and am proud to be a part of it.

 

 

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This isn’t New York, but…

I can safely say that I saw some very high quality art today!! What a treat! And, I had “time to kill”, which as an artist means that I need to find something to draw on or, take in the answers others can give to you from their own visions. So, the perfect excuse!!

I have been meaning to get to the Gallery at 100 Market Street in Portsmouth to walk this show. I show here fairly often and the parameters of this show would have necessitated new work that I had no time to create. But, because I have a great respect for the curator and the quality of the work that she presents, I needed to make it a point to see “Guise, Garment and Textile”.

Steampunk Family, Astrida Schaiffer

Steampunk Family, Astrida Schaiffer

OK, I was hooked right here! The props and the photos of them on the “family” made it all too relevant. It almost felt like “Antiques Roadshow” where a participant shows up with the antique and all sorts of provenance.

David Mendelsohn is an acquaintance I very much admire, though he does push a feminist button or two with his work, when he eliminates heads and covers them with hat boxes.

David Mendelsohn's wall

David Mendelsohn’s wall

Dennis Perrin, "Watching for Swallows"

Dennis Perrin, “Watching for Swallows”

Denis Perrin’s work, including “Watching for Swallows” was so historically perfect I had to wonder if he was born 150 years ago. Style, paint and application was too incredibly European Impression, almost Berthe Morisot.

The 3rd floor belongs to Caroline Rufo. This articulate abstract craftswoman reinvents the likes of Richard Diebenkorn and all other painters who have taken their compositional inspiration from aerial photography. Her titles, like “Seeking Union” also allude to architecture and building, in the emotional sense.

"Seeking Union", (c) Caroline Rufo. Oil on board.

“Seeking Union”, (c) Caroline Rufo. Oil on board.

But, there is sometimes a sour note in a show this well executed. And, it is on the 4th floor, which tells me that it is good enough for the show, but maybe it needed to be on the 4th floor-for political reasons.

I am native American, so a piece like this entitled “The Raiding Party” was not a happy end. From purely aesthetic principles, a well-articulated and executed piece-but it smacks of knowing nothing of the Trail of Tears or any of the other atrocities that my people dealt with.

"The Raiding Party", (c)Debra Tillar, mixed media

“The Raiding Party”, (c)Debra Tillar, mixed media

Overall, this show is one of the best that Portsmouth has offered in a long time. And, since I am very pro First Amendment, I applaud all of the work in this show, whether or not I agree with politics or philosophy, because of the quality of the execution.

The Gallery at 100 Market Street in Portsmouth is open Monday-Friday on all 4 floors. The 3rd and 4th floors are not available on the week-ends. This show runs through mid-February.

 

 

Anne Vaughan, Sole City and turning 60

"Rose Window", (c) Anne Vaughan, oil on canvas.

“Rose Window”, (c) Anne Vaughan, oil on canvas.

I turned 60 today. I am not where I planned to be but in many ways, though where I am didn’t exist when I made those plans.

I never planned to be the Show Coordinator for an art association. And, this is a fun gig.

I also never planned to have other people’s work at my house prior to a show. Damn. I always want to buy it!!

Anne Vaughan entrusted two of her pieces with me for our next show-here’s “Rose Window”.  Anne’s work has the energy that beats most modern painters. This grandmother, a retired lawyer, and ex-museum docent, has a powerful, confident mark. Influenced by Delaunay, and the second wave of European Impressionists, she is highly adept at florals, landscapes and abstracts. Her most recent work delves into the socio-political with portraits of abused women, war victims, racially-triggered violence, etc.

I met Anne at the Red Saturday (BAA) event last year. She worked on a piece, and  set it down to dry. A child subsequently stepped on it, and for her, a “no big deal”.  She also sold a piece out of the parking lot later.

She will have this and another piece at Sole City this month. This group show will consist of work of mine, Anne Vaughan, Ruth Ann Bleau, Bill Moore, Beth Wittenberg, Christy Bruna, Erika Carty, Jim Munro and others. I will be hanging this show and pulling my own tomorrow afternoon.

 

Making the best of an odd situation

I am the master of taking something totally unexpected and making it work. I guess that comes from growing up in a reasonably dysfunctional household where some things were not in the general script, and I learned how to “wing” it.

Friday night, I met someone at the Portland Museum of Art, so we could share what was on display. Once we were through with the Paley collection, he announced that he can only do two hours of art, and had other things he needed to take care of. I am a sponge for good art, and realized as we took in the Picassos and Matisses, how somewhat starved I was for this kind of visual stimulation. I flatly stated that I was going to stay and see what was on the 2nd and 3rd floor. My departing date gave me permission, like I needed it. (I don’t think I’ll see this person again.)

So, I went upstairs to see the permanent collection of work which is primarily from the Impressionism through contemporary. Refreshing! I’d like to note here that though this museum may pale in stature to the MFA in Boston, it is comparable in quality.

On to the third floor, where, when I saw the huge Ellsworth Kelly, I decided a little documentation was in order. I found a docent who I asked about the photo policy. This museum has a policy that allows non-flash photography of work that belongs to the museum, and the name card have an icon which shows which ones are not. Unfortunately the Kelly is not theirs, and the Louise Nevelson photo was out of focus.

The young docent had also told me that the Paley Collection could be photographed even though it was on loan from MoMA. So, after taking a couple more quick ones upstairs, I went back down to the main floor.

The Guitar, Pablo Picasso @ The Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine

The Guitar, Pablo Picasso @ The Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine

Burghers of Calais (miniature), August Rodin @ The Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine.

Burghers of Calais (miniature), August Rodin @ The Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine.

These are both from the “Taste for Modernism” exhibit.

And, on the third floor is this remarkable piece called “Books in the Running Brook”, Alison HIldreth. This is part of their permanent collection. My only problem with this piece is where it is hung. It is impossible to take in the full impact looking directly straight at it.

Books in the Running Brooks

After I departed the museum, I still wasn’t done. And, I shot a few photos, thus creating a little art of my own…

Lampost in Portland, (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

Lampost in Portland, (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

I made it a good night!!