Blog Archives

Gabe Smith’s “Gray Planet” at the Gafney Library, Sanbornville, New Hampshire

This show exemplifies ALL of the reasons this blog came to exist, all of the reasons that I champion libraries in the area for showing really fine regional work, and finding and seeing work by a total unknown. (In a small place-like Sanbornville.)

Gabe Smith graduated high school in 2010, and is demonstrating in his show at the Gafney called “Gray Planet” sophistication in an art vocabulary that goes far beyond his years on the planet Earth and his scholastic art training.

His theme for his work is both very personal and universal. He has dealt with friends who have committed suicide and acts of self-harm. He approaches this theme with mediums, like motor oil and drywall, which are also very temporary and unstable, things that will chip and eventually fall apart. Much like us “gray people”. His mediums rarely are traditional and he relies on mixed medium, found objects and spray paint.

Gabe Smith at the Gafney

Gabe Smith at the Gafney

He was very gracious and walked through the show with me, explaining the inspiration of some pieces and the collage elements in others. Again, for a first-timer, extremely ready to face this art world.

"Hobo", (c)Gabe Smith

“Hobo”, (c)Gabe Smith

“Hobo” has among it’s materials used, old maps of Maine-they are the hobo’s face.

"Gray Planets" on the mantel, "Space and Stuff", large piece above, all (c) Gabe Smith

“Gray Planets” on the mantel, “Space and Stuff”, large piece above, all (c) Gabe Smith

Now, remind me again-where is this show?

So, Gabe is a multi-talented artist and also performed at the Wakefield Opera House tonight. The opening reception at the library was followed by his performance which I opted out of.

Find Gabe Smith Pop Culture Icon on YouTube, and check out http://gafneylibrary.weebly.com/ for library and show hours. This show is up until the end of the month.

 

 

 

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Anne Vaughan, Sole City and turning 60

"Rose Window", (c) Anne Vaughan, oil on canvas.

“Rose Window”, (c) Anne Vaughan, oil on canvas.

I turned 60 today. I am not where I planned to be but in many ways, though where I am didn’t exist when I made those plans.

I never planned to be the Show Coordinator for an art association. And, this is a fun gig.

I also never planned to have other people’s work at my house prior to a show. Damn. I always want to buy it!!

Anne Vaughan entrusted two of her pieces with me for our next show-here’s “Rose Window”.  Anne’s work has the energy that beats most modern painters. This grandmother, a retired lawyer, and ex-museum docent, has a powerful, confident mark. Influenced by Delaunay, and the second wave of European Impressionists, she is highly adept at florals, landscapes and abstracts. Her most recent work delves into the socio-political with portraits of abused women, war victims, racially-triggered violence, etc.

I met Anne at the Red Saturday (BAA) event last year. She worked on a piece, and  set it down to dry. A child subsequently stepped on it, and for her, a “no big deal”.  She also sold a piece out of the parking lot later.

She will have this and another piece at Sole City this month. This group show will consist of work of mine, Anne Vaughan, Ruth Ann Bleau, Bill Moore, Beth Wittenberg, Christy Bruna, Erika Carty, Jim Munro and others. I will be hanging this show and pulling my own tomorrow afternoon.

 

Art at the Rochester Public Library, Rochester, NH for the rest of January, 2015

This whole corridor of southeastern Maine and New Hampshire, including the Berwicks, York and Kittery in Maine, and Dover, Somersworth, Rollinsford, and Rochester in New Hampshire have literally come alive since I moved back to the area in 2005. I have become very involved in two of the art associations, and the I am Show Coordinator for one, as well as on the curatorial board of the Rochester Museum of Fine Art.

The area has not kept up with gallery creation, and the economy still doesn’t support that kind of a venture without a “safety net”, but there are many great supportive venues like the libraries in the area.

I have shown five times at the Rochester Library in the new wing, where Peggy Trout arranges monthly shows with local artists and art groups. The old wing, or the Carnegie wing, displays some of the permanent collection of the Rochester Museum of Fine Art on the main floor. The Carnegie Gallery on the 2nd floor, is where the rotating and borrowed exhibits are hung.

Beth Wittenberg is on display on the main floor. Beth is a very active member of the Berwick Art Association and also a member of Blackbird Studio and Gallery, so we have shared lots of walls together. Beth and I also share a very special connection with art-making, where it seems neither of us have to rely on a muse, inspiration or even a good cup of coffee to need to make art.

works at the Rochester Public Library,(c)Beth Wittenberg

works at the Rochester Public Library,(c)Beth Wittenberg

What I love about Beth’s work is there is always more than meets the eye. In these pieces from 2013 and 2014,  she works very splattered and loose watercolor abstracts into pen-ink fantasy characters, that have color. As an abstract painter, I get lost in looking at the paint below the ink, and then float back to the finished work, appreciating it on multiple levels.

Upstairs, in the Carnegie Gallery are a collection of Dawn Boyer’s oils. Until I brush on my critiquing skills, I will respond as I have to Beth’s-as it relates to my work. Though she is responding to florals, I am looking beyond that again at paint and color. The brush work is solid and experienced. There isn’t hesitation. Nor, is there any immaturity in the palette-it is also self-assured.

Carnegie Gallery, (c) Dawn Boyer

Carnegie Gallery, Rochester Museum of Fine Art, (c) Dawn Boyer

Both of these shows will be up through the end of the month.

And, I will probably need to expand the corridor as I described it because I have been invited to show at the Gafney Library in Sanbornville, New Hampshire next month. Another 20 miles north of here.

 

 

“Tis the season!

Blackdird Dtudio with my small watercolors  and one of my smaller realistic pieces.

Blackbird Studio with my small watercolors and one of my smaller realistic pieces.

A group from the Blackbird Studio show including my Mongelati series in the corner

A group from the Blackbird Studio show including my Mongelati series in the corner

I stopped by Blackbird Studio today because a good friend wanted to check out the new show-and show her support by making a few small purchases.

As we sat drinking our beverages and gossiping in the gallery, the light snow fell softly outside. We watched it through the window, rimmed with a pine cone swag, as the fire crackled in the wood stove.

Yes, a very different kind of gallery and Christmas shopping sort of experience.

As Steffanie was about to leave, I was going to make an exit as well, but a car pulled into the lot, so I decided to stick around. A family had driven from Canterbury, New Hampshire-quite a hike from North Berwick, Maine, to visit.

I hope more people like them take the time to pay a visit as well.

Challenges, timelines and pure exhaustion

Thanksgiving week was all about prep for Red Saturday, the Berwick Art Association art fair and the hanging of the Sole City show. And, to make all of that happen, I took the end of my vacation time to make sure it did.

Now, in the meantime I met a very nice man online who lives an hour away…oh yeah, and did I mention the snowstorm that arrived on Thanksgiving Eve…I think by now you are getting the point. The vacation time was not a guarantee that I would see the Escher show at the Currier with George, make lots of wonderful product that would sell, and actually have a day or two to goof off.

Actually the part that DID happen was making lots of good product. All of that product will go to Blackbird Studios on Saturday. (When I define something as “product”, I am talking about wares other than pure fine art.) I finished a number of hand-beaded purses this last week.

Blue brocade bag, hand-beaded embellishments, satin lining

Blue brocade bag, hand-beaded embellishments, satin lining

The wear-and-tear of an art fair is tiring at best. Ten hours and the boiler in the building was out. Back to the snowstorm that made it impossible for a lot of this area to cook on Thanksgiving…so they had their turkey when we had our fair.

The snowstorm kept me from physically meeting my friend, much less seeing the exhibit.

Sunday, I felt like I had worked. But, the car  needed to be unloaded and reloaded to hang the Sole City show, the gem of the year.

Monday, that show went up-and quickly! Joanne, who arranges their shows, was a tremendous help and I am so excited to see all of this work up together. By late Monday afternoon, I felt like that milestone birthday I am approaching is real.

Sole City, hallway looking east

Sole City, hallway looking east

And, I am gearing up for my 2nd show as the Show Coordinator of the BAA-that opening is on Friday.

Erin Duquette thinks I have five clones, and I want to find one for a back massage.

Happy art making!

Fall to Earth, and Edward Jones openings this week-end

Jean Coughlin discusses Blackbird Studios with a woman interested in joining.

Jean Coughlin discusses Blackbird Studios with a woman interested in joining the collaborative.

I had two show openings this week-end.

The one at Edward Jones in Kittery, Maine is a part of a satellite program of the KAA, and I have 6 pieces there that will hang until April, 2015. https://www.facebook.com/kitteryartassociation?fref=photo for more information-and there is a picture of three of the artists (including me) and the curator, Judy Bryant.

“Fall to Earth” is the last regular show at Blackbird, and runs through December 7. This collective of 15 artists produces in my estimation, the best work in the area. There is no lack of variety, ingenuity, or experimentation. The work is on the grounds as well as inside. I have 9 framed pieces and around 30 unframed pieces as well as painted light switch plates and beaded handbags available  for purchase.

Our opening receptions have also included live music. Since we had a brief period of rain yesterday, the Rogue Town Managers moved inside. When the rain stopped, they moved back outside to entertain those seated under two tents.

The Rogue Town Managers during the downpour.

The Rogue Town Managers during the downpour. The red canvas in the upper left is mine.

The gallery hours are 11-6, Wednesday-Sunday. You might also catch prints being pulled off the flatbed press, an installation being mapped out, an artist being interviewed for MODspoke, a local e-zine, as well. 387 Somersworth Rd. (Rte. 9), North Berwick, Maine.

 

 

 

 

September Happenings

Coming up: September Song opening reception at Blackbird Studio & Gallery, 387 Somerswoth Road (Rte. 9), North Berwick, Maine on September 6th, from 3-7 PM. The Seacoast Moderns will host the opening for “Igniting the Modern Muse” (our gallery group show) on September 28th, from 4-6 PM at the Kittery Art Association, 8 Coleman Avenue, Kittery Point, Maine . I am planning to teach a rendering in watercolor workshop/how to layer, working wet-on-wet, to develop shadows and richness in color at Blackbird on Tuesday, September 16th and Tuesday, September 23rd, from 6-8 PM- two-2 hour classes, $45 per person, materials included. (Contact me @artinsmallplaces@gmail.com for more information) And today: marketing, marketing and more marketing. Etsy, Pinterest, FineArtAmerica, society6, Houzz, my website and my blog….for starters.

Blackbird Studio and Gallery at sunrise-the dawn of a new movement! (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

Blackbird Studio and Gallery at sunrise-the dawn of a new movement! (c)Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst

Lady in Red, Part II

The media gave us some attention, so I wanted to pass it on!!

http://fosters.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=%2F20130826%2FGJNEWS_01%2F130829521&template=SouthernMaineRegion

This is from the recent Lady in Red event in Berwick.

 

Lady in Red Event in Berwick, Maine

I posted a few weeks back that I had joined the Berwick Art Association and that they were having this event.

The weather was perfect for having a pleine air gathering. Artists painted and drew, photographers shot. There were many great images to capture.

There were a few musical performances, as well. The Lady in Red played violin and sang when she made her entrance. Hilton Park also provided some wonderful folk, blues and even a little cover of an old Ray Davies tune.

The Our Lady of Peace Rectory is for sale and would be an amazing place for artists of all persuasions to meet, show, perform, teach, etc. The house on the property could be rented as studio/office spaces. I was one of the group to get a tour of the church. Oh my-let’s find the money, is all I can think!

Artists of all ages at LIR event

Artists of all ages at LIR event

Lady in Red with Hilton Park

Lady in Red with Hilton Park

Lady in Red performing for the Lady in Red Event

Lady in Red performing for the Lady in Red Event

I can SO imagine this for all art-type events!

I can SO imagine this for all art-type events!

 

 

 

Seacoast Moderns: Karen Camlin

The Seacoast Moderns is a group that had been formed within the Kittery Art Association in 2010. I am the present managing member.

We have two large group shows coming up, and I am doing the social media promotion. This site now has a number of followers, so I’d rather use it, that the group’s blog.

As members send me images and their bio information, I will post and make comments where appropriate.

Karen has been with the group longer than I and I have seen a variety of mediums used by her.  Here is one image that will be displayed in the upcoming shows, as well as her statement and bio.

"Between to Points", 2013 @Karen Camlin. Acrylic and graphite on paper.

“Between to Points”, 2013 @Karen Camlin. Acrylic and graphite on paper.

Artist’s Statement

 K. Harvey Camlin

(Karen Camlin)

 The art I create is varied in subject, medium, form and style. There was a time I wondered if I should be narrowing and refining my work to one medium, one form, one consistent style. This became less of a concern once I recognized that the body of my work shared, and referred to, my interest in capturing the surface quality of my subjects. These subjects range from those objects that can be seen to those subjects originating in my mind’s eye.

I no longer worry about narrowing my venues for expression. I enjoy building the skills and experience to work in several mediums, often combining these.

I work with the mediums that can best express my subjects. I work in forms and styles that can best convey my meaning. For me limiting my work to one specific medium, to one specific style, is equivalent to speaking with a limited vocabulary. For me this is what being an artist involves – the search for the best way to share what I see and what I want to say.

camlinkaren65@gmail.com

Karen studied art education at the University of Southern Maine

in Portland, and visual design (graphics) at Southeastern

Massachusetts University (now UMASS, Dartmouth). She has taken

numerous courses and workshops, with examples listed here:

greater Boston, Massachusetts area including the Harvard University

Extension School, Cambridge, Massachusetts; southern Maine

including Maine College of Art, Portland, Maine, Heartwood College

of Art, Kennebunk, Maine, Sanctuary Arts, Eliot, Maine; and at

Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, Deer Isle, Maine. Karen lives

in Wells and teaches art full-time in MSAD #35, South Berwick/Eliot,

Maine.

Karen’s work has been included in juried art shows in Massachusetts,

galleries in Massachusetts and Vermont, and represented in the

catalog of an international distributor, C.R. Fine Arts, Boston.

K. Harvey Camlin, the signature Karen often uses in her artwork,

refers to those names used over time in her personal life and

professional work.

Karen is a member of the Seacoast Moderns group and the Kittery

Art Association. Her work has been included in member shows of

these groups, and in exhibits of artwork by seacoast teachers at the

Kittery Art Association and in exhibits of artwork by faculty members

of Wells-Ogunquit C.S.D. and MSAD #35. Most recently, Karen’s

work has been shown in group exhibits at the Portsmouth Public

Library and Maine College of Art.

Karen’s work ranges in style from illustrative to graphic, with

abstraction being a current interest. She works in several mediums

often combining these for what they may do best to convey her

meaning.

For more information about work shown here, or for prices, please

contact Karen at camlinkaren65@gmail.com.

More to come and I will bring Karen back to show you entirety of this series later in the month.