Blog Archives

“In the Name of Progress”, and my solo this month

In the Name of Progress

This is finished just in time for my show this month at the Franklin Gallery, in RiverStones Framing at 33 No. Main Street in Rochester, NH called “Transitions and Transmissions”.

To me, this image speaks volumes about how progress has left so much of our past literally in the dust. So much about the context of this is wrong. Where’s the farm? It’s parked on the side of US 202 in Maine. The flat tire and the chains in the middle of summer also adds to the story.

The collection that will be included is half abstracts and half pieces similar to this one.

I hope you can stop by for the opening reception on August 11, from 5-7.

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Since March??

OK, this is pathetic. I haven’t posted anything in almost four months.

It has been a weird year so far, and I’m not going to make any further excuses. There are lots of changes on the horizon, and I’ve been concentrating on trying to meld ideas and paint. And, I am no longer trying to make it make sense. A change is just that.

The new work was not spawned but reinforced by two commissions, and a sale of two other realistic watercolors.

Below is Chris’ first piece which, when I delivered it,  responded with “That’s f–king awesome!” Guess he liked it. And, enough that I am finishing up another one for him which I will deliver next week.

So, with this bit of prompting, I am revisiting this kind of work. As long as it involves a paint brush and paint.

Milton Auto Works almost

Black Ground series

This is an update of the Black Grounds, now named Jealousy and Fear. There are still some possible finishing touches on both but I am pretty comfortable.

Black Ground-FearBlack Ground-Jealousy.JPG

Black Ground series, drawings and paintings

Last January, a work mate and friend gave me a pad of black paper. I loved black paper in college but haven’t worked much on it since. I have two smaller works solos coming up and this presented a perfect opportunity to work with pastel.

The first drawings have been well-enough received that I then did a 24″ x 36″ oil and oil pastel and chalk painting called “Melting”, which is in the Art PM show at BUOY Gallery in Kittery, Maine.

Melting

Today, I started the color on pre-painted black canvases:

Black Ground 2

Black Ground 3

I sure like it when my confidence is restored. As elegant and simple as “Melting” is, these are much more in keeping with my style. Neither are finished, and don’t have titles as yet, either.

“Fancy Parade” and other recent work

I Cried About Paris. Twice. finished

The featured piece for this show by Great Bay Community College is “I Cried About Paris. Twice”, shown above. This piece is 36″ x 48″, and oil on canvas. The tragedy in November was the catalyst for this piece. It also felt very close to “home” since my sister had been in this part of Paris less than 4 months before.

There is no piece in this show smaller than 48″ x 24″, so I am saying that this is the largest show I have ever put up, even though there are only 13 pieces total.

The title piece and one companion are both on unstretched canvas and are mounted mush like tapestries. “Fancy Parade”, 98″ x 69″ is shown here:

DSCN0678

Both of these pieces are examples of what the college refers to as my “fearless use of color”. They also demonstrate the two predominant styles in the show. These larger pieces need to be treated with thin paint because of the instability of the painted surface. However, more expressive stretched canvases are worked primarily with a knife.

The inspiration for “Fancy Parade” and “Untarnished Symphony” is the celebration of life and color. I recently also lost my mother and an old dear friend. They are memorialized in the two “Pacific Suite” pieces. I also just heard that a good friend’s brother has passed-I may pay a small tribute to him in the same way.

Sandpiper and Santa Barbara

This is “Pacific Suite: Sandpiper and Santa Barbara”, 36″ x 48″, oil on canvas.

This show is up through April 29th, with an opening reception on March 10, from 5-7. Gateway Gallery is located in the main foyer of Great Bay Community College, 320 Corporate Drive, Portsmouth, NH 03801. The public is welcome to visit during college hours (see their website) and to attend the reception which will be catered by the Green Bean Restaurant.

Please also feel free to visit my website at dadartthurst.com

 

 

“The Folly of Sentiment”

I have a favorite new work of mine.

As I am allowing myself to explore, reinvent, and recombine that which I’ve done before-none of this is new territory if you know my entire body of work-but I continue to surprise myself.

I am far more comfortable in a larger format on canvas than on paper, but that is changing.

“The Folly of Sentiment” is another flex of my artistic muscle where I am employing some of the new things that I am seeing, but more so, utilizing materials and techniques, palettes, etc that I have in the past and combining them in different ways. “Valentine”, presently at the BUOY Gallery in Kittery, Maine, was the first of the “Portraits” to include assemblage elements, with bits of magazine photos. I found foil paper and a plastic mesh “bag” (which I cut apart and stretched) to integrate into this piece.

"The Folly of Sentiment", (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, mixed media on handmade paper, 28"x 34", framed

“The Folly of Sentiment”, (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, mixed media on handmade paper, 28″x 34″, framed

The last Blackbird Studio and Gallery newsletter reiterated something that I said at an opening, but I am not entirely sure it is 100% correct. It said that I am being “influenced” by whose working around me. I don’t doubt that that is happening but this little piece, painted just after I broke my leg, might show that the “Portraits” have always been there.

"When Life Gives You Lemons", (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, Mixed media on floor tile, 12' x 12"

“When Life Gives You Lemons”, (c) Daryl-Ann Dartt Hurst, Mixed media on floor tile, 12′ x 12″, 2013

The “Portrait” series actually has an even earlier ancestor in a series called “Everyman”, which dates back to 1990. So, it really is too soon to say the influences come from Blackbird, which isn’t a bad thing, but more that those influences have awakened other muses within me, that were just dormant. I don’t have digital images of the “Everyman” series  yet, but they are also the predecessors of the large 2014 canvas “Chasing the Sun”.

This and a few other new pieces will be in the opening exhibit at Blackbird Studio and Gallery. We are also very proud to be hosting a visit by Carolyn Chute, author of “The Beans of Egypt, Maine”. Please join us for this event on April 18, from 1-3.

 

 

Timeless Framing show

I have a one-person show up though the end of the month at Timeless Framing in Rochester. NH. I stopped to see it next on my “art around the area”.

 

Timeless Show

Timeless Show,through April

These are all of the recent “Portraits”, and a few of the transitional works.

The opening  reception for this is next Friday, from 5-7.

If you are interested, please visit my website at http://www.dadartthurst.com and Friend me on Facebook at Daryl-Ann Hurst Studio.

Press release for Timeless and the Rochester Library

The next couple of months will be very big for the visual arts in the area. Events are starting to overlap, and I can only be in so many places at once!!

This is my contribution to artwork offerings.

Timeless and Rochester Library press release

I hope all can attend!

Size matters

I saw the work at the Carnegie Gallery by the South African artist Marsi van de Huevel yesterday. The Carnegie Gallery is an amazing little art oasis in Rochester, New Hampshire in the Rochester Public Library, which is curated by the Rochester Museum of Fine Art. I am a member of the board and proud to be representing this incredible work.

 

"The Moon", (c)Marsi van de Huevel, giclee, but the original is graphite.

“The Moon”, (c)Marsi van de Huevel, giclee, but the original is graphite.

First, there is the medium. This work is painstakingly produced with pen and ink. Incredibly time-consuming.

Secondly, larger than “sketchbook scale” here is also presented.  Scale in some mediums isn’t questioned. It used to be, “the bigger the more important”, because, well, it’s harder to ignore. So bigger oils and acrylics are now often dismissed just BECAUSE of size, meaning that rule really doesn’t apply to painting unless they really deserve the size. That rule has been around for decades.

Dry mediums and watercolor are usually not presented in a larger format, nor are pen and inks, which is why van de Huevel’s and work I need to revisit at The Gallery at 100 Market Street are important. It is time we challenge what can be large, and ignore the framing!

To be continued…

Largest show of mine to date: Gafney Library, Sanbornville, NH

I was given an opportunity to show as many as 60 pieces this month. I showed up with 49, and based on the images the curator sent me, that seems to have worked really well.

Since I also coordinate the shows for the Berwick Art Association, I needed to dash before the show was completely hung.

Here are some of the images that Peter sent down:

the main wall at Gafney including "Truant's Holiday"

the main wall at Gafney including “Truant’s Holiday”

"Catch the Sun" at Gafney

“Catch the Sun” at Gafney

This is a great show, and demonstrates much of what I explored artistically last year.

The opening reception is from 10-12, February 21st. Hope to see you all!